trabecula

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trabecula

 [trah-bek´u-lah] (L.)
a small beam or supporting structure; used in anatomic nomenclature to designate various fibromuscular bands or cords providing support in various organs, as heart, penis, and spleen, adj., adj trabec´ular.
trabeculae of bone anastomosing bony spicules in cancellous bone which form a meshwork of intercommunicating spaces that are filled with bone marrow.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tra·bec·u·la

, gen. and pl.

tra·bec·u·lae

(tră-bek'yū-lă, -lē), [TA]
1. A meshwork; one of the supporting bundles of fibers traversing the substance of a structure, usually derived from the capsule or one of the fibrous septa.
2. A small piece of the spongy substance of bone usually interconnected with other similar pieces.
3. In histopathology, a band of neoplastic tissue two or more cells wide.
[L. dim. of trabs, a beam]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

trabecula

(trə-bĕk′yə-lə)
n. pl. trabecu·lae (-lē′)
1. Any of the supporting strands of connective tissue projecting into an organ and constituting part of the framework of that organ.
2. Any of the fine spicules forming a network in cancellous bone.

tra·bec′u·lar adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tra·bec·u·la

, pl. trabeculae (tră-bek'yū-lă, -lē) [TA]
1. One of the supporting bundles of fibers traversing the substance of a structure, usually derived from the capsule or one of the fibrous septa.
2. A small piece of the spongy substance of bone usually interconnected with other similar pieces.
3. histopathology A band of neoplastic tissue two or more cells wide.
[L. dim. of trabs, a beam]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

trabecula

Supporting strands of connective tissue constituting part of the framework of an organ.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

tra·bec·u·la

, pl. trabeculae (tră-bek'yū-lă, -lē) [TA]
Meshwork; one of the supporting bundles of fibers traversing substance of a structure, usually derived from the capsule or one of the fibrous septa.
[L. dim. of trabs, a beam]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
This is because the iStent Inject can be "over-implanted" and completely embedded within trabecular tissue, with no contact with aqueous in the anterior chamber.
Smith's initial description of trabeculotomy ab externo in 1960 involves passing a nylon filament around Schlemm's canal via an external radial incision and rupturing the trabecular tissue in a drawstring fashion [10].
Allen and Burian described an alternative technique of trabeculotomy using specifically designed rigid probes (Figure 2) that achieved sector opening of the trabecular tissue in 1962 [11].
Because adults of this species can be up to 2 m in length, and assuming that the trabecular tissues are continuous throughout the animal, Rhabdocalyptus must represent one of the largest syncytial organisms within the metazoa.