totipotency

(redirected from Totipotent stem cells)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Totipotent stem cells: Pluripotent stem cells

to·ti·po·ten·cy

, totipotence (tō'tē-pō'ten-sē, tō-tip'ō-tens),
The ability of a cell to differentiate into any type of cell and thus form a new organism or regenerate any part of an organism; for example, a fertilized ovum, or a small excised portion of a Planaria, which is capable of regenerating a complete new organism.
[L. totus, entire, + potentia, power]

totipotency

/to·ti·po·ten·cy/ (to″tĭ-po´ten-se) the ability to differentiate along any line or into any type of cell.totip´otenttotipoten´tial

totipotency

[tō′tipō′tənsē]
the ability of a cell, particularly a zygote, to differentiate into any of a number of specialized cells and thus form a new organism or regenerate a body part. Also called totipotence.

to·ti·po·ten·cy

, totipotence (tō-tip'ŏ-tĕn-sē, -tĕns)
The ability of a cell to differentiate into any type of cell and thus form a new organism or regenerate any part of an organism.
[L. totus, entire, + potentia, power]

totipotency

the ability of a cell or tissue to give rise to adult structures. The capacity is often lost in adult cells (particularly in animals) which, having differentiated into one specific type, cannot change to another type of cell. see GURDON, CELL DIFFERENTIATION.

totipotency (tōˈ·ti·pōˑ·ten·sē),

n ability of a cell, specifically a zygote, to develop and differentiate into a complete organism or to regenerate a body part. Also called
totipotence.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first four of five divisions of the cell after somatic cell nuclear transfer result in totipotent stem cells.
If the earliest totipotent stem cells in any developing organism were isolated from one another in the uterus, each could produce an organism that would be an identical "clone" of the other.
Totipotent stem cells have "the theoretical and perhaps real potential to become any kind of cell and under appropriate conditions, such as implantation in a uterus, could become an entire individual," according to testimony given by Dr.
This finding not only identifies a new mechanism that regulates totipotent stem cells, but also reveals the importance of non-coding RNAs in stem cell fate.
Totipotent stem cells are produced from the fusion of an egg and a sperm cell.
They distinguish totipotent stem cells in an embryo until four days old (these can develop into all the cells of the body); pluripotent stem cells or embryonic stem cells which begin forming after four days and continue for eight months (these can develop into most of the cells in the body); and multipotent stem cells which can develop into many body cells but have significant limitations (these exist throughout human life).
Totipotent stem cells can be obtained from blastocysts or other forms of early embryos.