Total thyroidectomy

Total thyroidectomy

A surgical procedure that removes the entire thyroid gland.
Mentioned in: Thyroid Cancer
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
FRIDAY, July 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing total thyroidectomy, the occurrence rate of complications decreases as annual surgeon volumes increase, according to a study published online July 25 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.
[8,10,11] Although recently prolonged patient stay at hospital is avoided [12,13] and patients are preferably discharged within 24 hours post-op, it is very essential to identify patients at high risk of developing symptomatic hypocalcaemia so as to initiate preventive treatment early in order to reduce their chances of emergency ward visit after total thyroidectomy. [12-14] Permanent hypocalcaemia is due to persistent postoperative hypoparathyroidism because of devascularisation, injury or inadvertent dissection of parathyroid glands during the surgery.
investigated the relationship between body weight, BMI, LBM, and the dose of Lthyroxine in patient groups that had undergone total thyroidectomy for benign and malignant thyroid conditions.
Total thyroidectomy has now become the preferred option for all patients presenting with bilateral benign multinodular goiter5, Graves' disease6 and most patients with thyroid cancer7.
Study group consisted of euthyroid patients admitted to the Endocrine surgery outpatient clinic between January and December 2013, and scheduled to undergo total thyroidectomy. Thyroidectomy indications were malignancy, suspicious malignancy, nodules larger than 4 cm, Basedow-Graves disease and symptomatic multi-nodular goitre like dyspnea and etc.
The most common complication following total thyroidectomy is hypocalcaemia, which can be either transient or permanent.
Management of these cases varies from follow-up by conventional ultrasonography together with Tg levels, to total thyroidectomy with or without radioactive iodine ablation.10 In this case, the absence of natural thyroid tissue arising on MCT was commented in favour of a metastatic lesion originating from thyroid gland.
The patient underwent a total thyroidectomy. The postoperative course had a favorable evolution and the patient was discharged with no complication (hypocalcemia or recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis).
Our case was first referred to our clinic by the Pediatric Surgery Department following a total thyroidectomy performed following determination of multinodular goiter, thyroid nodules containing calcification and a hypoechoic area via ultrasonography.
Two months later, the patient underwent a total thyroidectomy for his multinodular goiter.
41.1% (44/107) of patients with HCN underwent total thyroidectomy and 50.5% (54/107) had thyroid lobectomy.

Full browser ?