total iron-binding capacity


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total iron-binding capacity (TIBC),

an indirect method of determining the transferrin level in serum. Transferrin is saturated by the addition of iron to a serum specimen. Excess iron is removed, and the specimen is analyzed for iron content. The result is the total amount of iron that can be bound by transferrin. This result is helpful in differentiating anemias: high TIBC is associated with iron deficiency, low TIBC is associated with excess iron.

to·tal iron-bind·ing ca·pac·i·ty

(TIBC) (tō'tăl ī'ŏrn bīnd'ing kă-pas'i-tē)
An indirect method of determining the transferrin level in serum. Transferrin is saturated by the addition of iron to a serum specimen. Excess iron is removed, and the specimen is analyzed for iron content. The result is the total amount of iron that can be bound by transferrin. This result is helpful in differentiating anemias: high TIBC is associated with iron deficiency, low TIBC is associated with excess iron.

iron

a chemical element, atomic number 26, atomic weight 55.847, symbol Fe. See Table 6. Iron is chiefly important to the animal body because it is the main constituent of hemoglobin, cytochrome, and other components of respiratory enzyme systems. A constant although small intake of iron in food is needed to replace erythrocytes that are destroyed in the body processes.

iron-59
a radioisotope of iron having a half-life of 45 days; used in ferrokinetics tests to determine the rate at which iron is cleared from the plasma and incorporated in red cells. Symbol 59Fe.
iron binding
absorbed iron is rapidly and tightly bound to a specific transport protein, transferrin or siderophilin, from which it is discharged at iron receptor sites in the bone marrow.
iron dextran
an injectable form of iron used in the prevention of iron deficiency. See iron poisoning (below).
iron galactan
used as an injection vehicle for iron in young piglets.
iron nutritional deficiency
is most common in piglets raised on sows kept indoors under artificial conditions. Clinical signs are pallor, dyspnea, edema of the head and a secondary diarrhea.
organic iron poisoning
see iron poisoning (below).
iron overload
storage of excessive iron in body tissues such as occurs in human idiopathic hemochromatosis is not recorded in animals, but overload may occur as a result of excessive therapy.
iron poisoning
overdosing piglets with iron compounds by mouth causes diarrhea and death. Organic iron preparations, usually dextrans, injected in piglets can cause deaths acutely, within an hour or two of injection. At postmortem examination there is myonecrosis of skeletal muscle. Deaths have also occurred within a few minutes of intramuscular injection of organic iron preparations in horses. Sudden death due to massive liver damage also recorded in newborn foals dosed orally with ferrous fumarate with or without yeast in a paste. Asymmetry of the hindquarters in pigs is also recorded as a sequel of intramuscular injections of iron. See also asymmetric hind quarter syndrome. Bore water often contains significant levels of iron and when used for fish culture in dams may cause mortalities.
iron pool
a source of readily available iron for metabolic emergencies, probably located in the bone marrow.
iron storage disease
hemochromatosis.
iron-sulfur proteins
polypeptides that contain iron-sulfur centers capable of Fe2S2 or Fe4S4 stoichiometry and with standard reduction potential between NAD+ and ubiquinone. Critical components of many electron transport chains, e.g. in oxidative phosphorylation and photosynthesis.
total iron-binding capacity
the serum iron plus the unbound iron-binding capacity of the serum.
iron turnover
see iron turnover.
unbound iron-binding capacity
that portion of the plasma transferrin molecule that is not bound to Fe3+.
iron-yeast paste
highly hepatoxic in some newborn foals when fed as a dietary supplement.
References in periodicals archive ?
The relation between chemically measured total iron-binding capacity concentrations and immunologically measured transferrin concentrations in human serum.
Laboratory evaluation will often reveal a hypochromic/microcytic anemia, elevated red cell distribution width, thrombocytosis, decreased ferritin and serum iron, and an elevated total iron-binding capacity.
Transferrin saturation can be calculated from the ratio of serum iron concentration to total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) expressed as a percentage [(serum iron/ TIBC) x 100] or, instead, using the sum of serum iron and unsaturated iron-binding capacity (UIBC): [TIBC.
We reported recently that total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) values calculated from serum iron and unsaturated iron-binding capacity (UIBC) values were significantly lower than those obtained by a direct and fully automated TIBC assay (1, 2).
Adding measures of serum iron and total iron-binding capacity will help identify problems in women who are runners.
Total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) indicates the maximum amount of iron needed to saturate plasma or serum transferrin (TRF), which is the primary iron-transport protein (1).
Related tests, including total iron-binding capacity, ferritin, folate levels, and guaiac stool tests, should also be considered.
Total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) indicates the maximum amount of iron necessary to saturate all available transferrin iron-binding sites.
The serum total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) represents the maximum concentration of iron that can be bound by an individual's serum protein.
The method for total iron-binding capacity was J&S alumina adsorption, with CVs of 3.
The TS assay is a two-step assay with serum iron in the numerator and total iron-binding capacity, unsaturated iron-binding capacity (UIBC), or serum transferrin in the denominator.
Total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) was determined by a method modified from the one recommended by the International Committee for Standardisation in Hematology (18).

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