tort

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tort

Etymology: L, tortus, twisted
(in law) a civil wrong, other than a breach of contract. Torts include negligence, false imprisonment, assault, and battery. The elements of a tort are a legal duty owed by the defendant to the plaintiff, a breach of duty, and damage from the breach of duty. A tort may be constitutional, in which one person deprives another of a right or immunity guaranteed by the Constitution; personal, in which a person or a person's reputation or feelings are injured; or intentional, in which the wrong is a deliberate act that is unlawful. Many other kinds of torts exist. tortious, adj.

tort

Law & medicine An act deemed unlawful and capable of triggering a civil action; the wrongdoer–tortfeasor may be held liable in damages. See Malpractice, Negligence Opthalmology verb To rotate an eye on its anteroposterior axis.

tort,

n civil infractions (except for breach of contract) that result in injury entitling compensation. Includes but is not limited to trespassing, negligence, and defamation.

tort,

n a legal wrong perpetrated on a person or property, independent of contract.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, an interpretive account should be falsifiable if it is truly taking tort law doctrines at face value.
The interactive museum showcases the history of tort law, along with wrongful injury claims involving automobiles, asbestos, even hot coffee.
Given the cost of litigation, and the poverty of the working population, tort law was largely irrelevant.
Grounds for judgment and recovery of damages under tort law may be made when "[a] person .
VAN BOOM, Harmonizing Tort Law: A Comparative Tort Law and Economic Analysis, en M.
Their use may give the parties more acceptable outcomes than traditionally found in tort law, but ultimately, the key to their success relies on the working relationships of the contracting parties.
Until recently, tort law in various countries did not seek to intervene in family law even when criminal law in these countries perceived the acts as improper and regarded them as felonies.
In Part II, we briefly trace the doctrine navigating the tension between the First Amendment and tort law, showing how the Court's decisions have led to the view of private law as government regulation displayed in Snyder.
This lexicon invokes the general negligence principle requiring an examination of the substance of the action when in fact tort law does not extend the scope of duty and liability that far.
But his interest in comparative law informed his early interest in tort law and encouraged him in his view that all law, including tort law, was shaped fundamentally by forces outside the law.
In Israel, tort law was originally pure English common law, adopted by legislation and later developed judicially.