Topical corticosteroids

Topical corticosteroids

Cortisone and related drugs used on the skin and in the eye, usually for allergic conditions.
Mentioned in: Corneal Ulcers
References in periodicals archive ?
There was a seven-day wash out period of all other therapies before treatment, and topical corticosteroids were not allowed throughout the 12-week treatment period.
Management of nummular dermatitis requires strong anti-inflammatory medications, usually mid-potency or higher topical corticosteroids, along with moisturizers and limiting exposure to skin irritants.
TABLE Topical corticosteroids of varying potency that can be considered for treating lichen sclerosus Potency Corticosteroid ointment Very high Clobetasol propionate 0.05$ Betamethasone dipropionate 0.05% High Mometasone furoate 0.1% Moderate Triamcinolone 0.1% Low Hydrocortisone 1%
Plaque psoriasis affects approximately 7.5 million Americans with potent topical corticosteroids prescribed to approximately 80% of psoriasis patients diagnosed.
Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airway that mostly responds to topical corticosteroids. However, 5-10% of patients have severe disease that fails to respond well to treatment.
Prior treatments included topical corticosteroids, minoxidil, and intralesional corticosteroids; four patients had not been treated previously
Plaque psoriasis affects more than 7.5 m Americans with potent topical corticosteroids prescribed to approximately 80% of psoriasis patients diagnosed.
Therapy includes mostly topical corticosteroids of low to medium potency and emollients, which may be combined.
However, better skin hydration was seen with the test facial moisturizer versus topical corticosteroids. Patients' subjective evaluation demonstrated TA more rapidly improved sensation sensitivity.
Topical corticosteroids have a long history of effectiveness in a wide spectrum of dermatological conditions, especially those characterized by hyperproliferation, inflammation, and immunological involvement.
While the deleterious effect of low-dose systemic corticosteroids on bone homeostasis has long been established [2], a considerable degree of uncertainty is still yet to be unraveled as to the effect of topical corticosteroids. Children in particular are more prone to the development of systemic adverse effects relating to topically applied corticosteroids due to their higher ratio of total body surface area to total body weight [3].
spinosa were classified as the patient group, and patients with localized vitiligo who were treated with topical corticosteroids were classified as the control group.