tonic-clonic seizure


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Related to tonic-clonic seizure: grand mal seizure, Myoclonic seizure

seizure

 [se´zhur]
1. the sudden attack or recurrence of a disease.
2. a convulsion or attack of epilepsy.
absence seizure the seizure seen in petit mal epilepsy, marked by a momentary break in the stream of thought and activity, accompanied by a symmetrical spike and wave at 3 cycles per second on the electroencephalogram. Called also petit malseizure. See epilepsy.
atonic seizure an absence seizure characterized by sudden loss of muscle tone.
complex partial seizure see partial seizure.
febrile seizure febrile convulsion.
focal seizure partial seizure.
focal motor seizure a simple partial seizure consisting of clonus or spasm of a muscle or muscle group, occurring either singly or in a continuous repetitive series.
generalized tonic-clonic seizure (grand mal seizure) the seizure seen in grand mal epilepsy, marked by loss of consciousness and generalized tonic convulsions followed by clonic convulsions. See epilepsy.
jackknife s's infantile spasms.
myoclonic seizure one characterized by a brief episode of myoclonus.
partial seizure any seizure due to a lesion in a specific, known area of the cerebral cortex; symptoms vary with different lesion locations. A simple partial seizure is the most localized type, with a discharge that is predominantly one-sided or presents localized features without loss of consciousness. A complex partial seizure is associated with disease of the temporal lobe and characterized by varying degrees of impairment of consciousness. See epilepsy.
petit mal seizure absence seizure.
reflex seizure (sensory seizure) an epileptic seizure in response to a sensory stimulus, which may be tactile, visual, auditory, or musical.
simple partial seizure see partial seizure.
tonic-clonic seizure see generalized tonic-clonic seizure.

ton·ic-·clo·nic sei·zure

a seizure characterized by a sequence consisting of a tonic-clonic phase; when generalized, constitutes what has been known as a "grand mal" seizure.

tonic-clonic seizure

n.
A generalized seizure marked by convulsions and loss of consciousness. Also called grand mal seizure.

tonic-clonic seizure

an epileptic seizure characterized by a generalized involuntary muscular contraction and cessation of respiration followed by tonic and clonic spasms of the muscles. Breathing resumes with noisy respirations. The teeth may be clenched, the tongue bitten, and control of the bladder or bowel lost. As this phase of the seizure passes, the person may fall asleep or experience confusion. Usually the person has no recall of the seizure on awakening. A sensory warning, or aura, can precede each tonic-clonic seizure. These seizures may occur singly, at intervals, or in close succession. Anticonvulsant medications are usually prescribed as prophylaxis against tonic-clonic seizures. Also called grand mal seizure. Compare absence seizure, focal seizure, psychomotor seizure.

tonic-clonic seizure

Generalized tonic-clonic seizure, see there, aka grand mal seizure. See Grand mal seizure.

ton·ic-clo·nic sei·zure

(tonik-klonik sēzhŭr)
One characterized by a sequence consisting of a tonic-clonic phase; when generalized, constitutes what has been known as a "grand mal" seizure.

tonic-clonic seizure,

n seizure distinguished by a sudden loss of consciousness and involuntary muscle contraction that lasts for a few mi-nutes. Persons affected may bite their tongues, clench their teeth, and lose control of bodily functions such as defecation or urination. Often the patient has no memory of the event on awakening. Also called
grand mal seizure.

seizure

1. the sudden attack or recurrence of a disease.
2. a convulsion or attack of epilepsy.

audiogenic seizure
a seizure brought on by sound.
cerebral seizure
an attack of epilepsy.
epileptiform seizure
focal seizure
see partial seizure (below).
generalized seizure
see grand mal seizure (below).
grand mal seizure
one with no localizing signs. After a brief period of restlessness, there is unconsciousness, generalized muscular activity, excessive salivation, chewing activity, opisthotonos, running movements, and often urination and defecation. The most common type of seizure in dogs and cats.
Jacksonian seizure
partial seizure
one restricted to a focus in the brain; signs correspond to the area affected, e.g. motor activity of an isolated area or limb, hallucinations such as fly catching, apparent blindness, behavioral abnormalities, etc. Called also focal seizures.
petit mal seizure
a mild, very brief generalized seizure. See also petit mal.
photogenic seizure
a seizure brought on by light.
psychomotor seizure
motor seizures accompanied by a psychic stage. There are hallucinations, salivation, pupillary dilatation, mastication, fecal and urinary excretion, and wild running. Seen in dogs with lesions in the pyriform lobe or hippocampus and from poisoning with agenized flour (canine hysteria). Called also running fits.
tetanic seizure
see tetany.
seizure threshold
the level of stimulation at which a seizure is precipitated.
tonic seizure
one in which the muscles are rigid.
tonic-clonic seizure
alternating tonic (rigid muscles) and clonic (jerking of muscles) phases; a grand mal seizure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Health care providers should consider radiographic evaluation when a tonic-clonic seizure results in spinal pain, especially before delivering spinal mobilization or adjustments.
Her tonic-clonic seizures have increased in frequency, requiring gradual increases in her carbamazepine therapy, and myoclonic features have emerged.
Differences between Generalised Tonic-Clonic and Focal-onset Seizures evolving to Generalised Tonic-Clonic Seizures Differences GTCS ->GTCS Aura No A->B->C, A->C/B->C Focal brain lesion No Active or scar lesion Inter-ictal EEG Brief Generalised Focal spike and wave spike and wave Ictal EEG Generalised spike Focal evolving spiky rhythm and wave A = Aura; B = Blank; C = GTCS.
Immediately, generalized tonic-clonic seizure was witnessed in the patient.
One type, generalized seizures, includes generalized tonic-clonic seizures (formerly called "grand mal" seizures), tonic seizures, atonic seizures, or absence seizures (formerly called "petit mal" seizures).
The differential diagnosis would be myocardial ischaemia causing an arrhythmia but a tonic-clonic seizure is unlikely in that setting.
When someone is having a generalized tonic-clonic seizure, scans show increased blood flow to the seizure.
He cited as an example a 13-year-old girl who has a first generalized tonic-clonic seizure, a sister who has already been diagnosed with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, and an EEG trace that suggests JME.
For the majority of patients, a generalized tonic-clonic seizure begins with a loss of consciousness without any prior warning symptoms and a sudden contraction of the tonic muscles, causing the patient to fall down (tonic phase).
Typically in NCSE, a patient will undergo a tonic-clonic seizure, followed by a continuous or punctuated period of behavioral change or degree of obtundation that will occur for about 30 minutes with identifiable seizure activity on an BEG.
Most frequently patients with generalized nonconvulsive status epilepticus will be elderly, often female, benzodiazepine abusers or users of neuroleptic medications or antiepileptic drugs with a sudden change in drug use; have a concurrent infection; and have a prior tonic-clonic seizure that "kicks off" the NCSE state, Dr.
A 10-year-old boy was admitted to hospital in Bologna, Italy after suffering a 2 minute tonic-clonic seizure.