statute of limitations

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statute of limitations

[stach′o̅o̅t]
Etymology: L, statuere, to set up, limes, boundary
(in law) a statute that sets a limit of time during which a suit may be brought or criminal charges may be made. In a malpractice suit, dispute may arise as to whether the time set by the particular statute of limitations begins to run at the time of the injury or at the time of the discovery of the injury.

statute of limitations

Malpractice A doctrine that allows a plaintiff 2 to 3 yrs–depending upon the state in the US, from the time of the alleged malpractice or negligence–by a physician or hospital–to file a lawsuit. See Emancipated minor, Malpractice.

Statute of Limitations

the law which limits the time after an event during which a court action related to a claim for damages arising out of the event can be initiated.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Leisinger claims his permissive counterclaim relates back to the filing of Jacobson's conversion claim, effectively tolling the statute of limitations, this argument is without merit.
The Superior Court, Los Angeles County, ruled that there was no basis for tolling the statute.
The court held, inter alia, that there was no basis whatsoever for tolling the statute.
Tolling the statute of limitations against directors and accountants for negligent acts that happened a half century ago seems outrageous.
See Marcus, supra note 21, at 860 ("[C]onduct [worthy of tolling the statute of limitation] is not easily separated, chronologically or otherwise, from the conduct that underlies the claim.
27) More recently, however, courts have moved towards tolling the statute of limitations until the plaintiff had, or should have had, knowledge of the harm.
Was the physician's absence from the state for over one year after the alleged act of medical malpractice grounds for tolling the statute of limitations?