Toker cell

Toker cell

(tō'kĕr),
an epithelial cell with clear cytoplasm found in 10% of normal nipples; contains keratin 7, like Paget carcinoma cells, from which it must be distinguished cytologically.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

To·ker cell

(tō'ker sel)
An epithelial cell with clear cytoplasm found in 10% of normal nipples; contains keratin 7, like Paget carcinoma cells, from which it must be distinguished cytologically.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Toker,

Cyril, U.S. pathologist, 1930–.
Toker cell - an epithelial cell with clear cytoplasm found in 10% of normal nipples.
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, florid papillomatosis of the nipple may have associated Toker cell hyperplasia in the epidermis, which may give a false impression of Paget disease.
Characteristics of clear cells and Toker cells in the epidermis of underlying nipple duct adenoma.
Toker cells, precursors of Paget's disease, have been postulated to be the cell of origin in CCP due to their similar anatomical distribution along the mammary line, histological features, and immunohistochemial profiles with both staining positively for EMA, CK-7, and other low-molecular weight cytokeratins.
In up to 13% of PD cases, no associated carcinoma is identified, implicating the role of Toker cells as the precursors of PD.
(4) Toker cells (clear cells that may occur singly and in small clusters in the lower epidermis) may be apparent within the ductal epithelium at the site of insertion.
The histogenesis of primary Paget disease remains elusive, with the proposed cells of origin including pluripotent epidermal stem cells, (49,50) adnexal stem cells, (51) intraepidermal Toker cells, (52,53) or apocrine glands.