toe walking


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toe walking

Orthopedics A defective gait, in which the Pts walk on 'tip-toes' due to force of habit, congenital tight heel cords or cerebral palsy with mild spasticity
References in periodicals archive ?
We used a contingent acoustical feedback procedure to increase appropriate walking and decrease toe walking exhibited by a young boy with autism.
A coordinated federal-provincial system, with a structured central policy, is the only possible intervention for the current idiopathic toe walking of provincial VAT.
Calf muscle-tendon lengths before and after Tendo-Achilles lengthenings and gastrocnemius lengthenings for equinus in cerebral palsy and idiopathic toe walking. Gait Posture [Internet].
This edition has a new appendix of apps, 70 new photos, 50 new activities, updated activities, and new chapters on increasing arches of the foot, decreasing external rotation of the hips, decreasing internal rotation of the hips, and addressing toe walking. ([umlaut] Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR)
These factors include: autism severities, rater effects, recall error, variability of treatment dose, testing in unfamiliar surroundings, and "toe walking".
Almost all of these kids will stop toe walking by age three and really don't need a referral or any further tests, though sometimes, if the exam isn't quite right, then an orthopedic evaluation can be a good idea.
A family history of toe-walking ranges from 30% to 71% in the literature and is considered a characteristic of idiopathic toe walking. (2-4)
He also suffers from a condition known as "toe walking" which means he needs splints and regular physiotherapy.
* Is there a family history of toe walking? Tiptoe walking is idiopathic in about 40% of children with a family history of tiptoe walkers, but it is important to obtain a family history because this can help in diagnosing Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Duchenne's muscular dystrophy, or a psychiatric disorder.
In addition, this decline in developmental level may be associated with the appearance of neurological abnormalities including hyperreflexia, toe walking, tremors, weakness, abnormal muscle tone, and progressive motor dysfunction.
Although common among children learning to walk, persistent toe walking can cause physical harm due to inefficient gate, and, in some cases, result in negative social interactions such as teasing and bullying.