Todd paralysis

(redirected from Todd's paresis)
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Todd pa·ral·y·sis

(tod),
paralysis of temporary duration (normally not more than a few days) that occurs in the limb or limbs involved in jacksonian epilepsy after the seizure.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Todd pa·ral·y·sis

(tod păr-al'i-sis)
Temporary inability to move (normally not more than a few days) that occurs in the limb or limbs involved in jacksonian epilepsy after a seizure.
Synonym(s): Todd postepileptic paralysis.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Todd paralysis

(tod)
[Robert B. Todd, Brit. physician, 1809–1860]
Transient, focal neurological deficits, occurring after a seizure, that resemble a stroke but resolve spontaneously.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

Todd,

Robert B., English physician, 1809-1860.
Todd paralysis - paralysis of temporary duration that occurs in the limb(s) involved in jacksonian epilepsy after the seizure. Synonym(s): Todd postepileptic paralysis
Todd postepileptic paralysis - Synonym(s): Todd paralysis
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The typical clinical presentation of AIS in toddlers and older children is an acute, prolonged neurological deficit such as hemiparesis, with or without seizures.7,15,17 Seizures at the onset of stroke are more frequent in younger children than in adults and as a result the diagnosis of stroke is not always considered until the child's 'Todd's paresis' does not resolve as expected.