titration

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titration

 [ti-tra´shun]
determination of a given component in solution by addition of a liquid reagent of known strength until a given endpoint, e.g., change in color, is reached indicating that the component has been consumed by reaction with the reagent.
Dean and Webb titration a test for measuring antibody in which varying dilutions of antibody are mixed with a constant quantity of antiserum; antibody activity is determined by the dilution in which flocculation occurs most rapidly, i.e., the end point.

ti·tra·tion

(tī-trā'shŭn),
Volumetric analysis by means of the addition of definite amounts of a test solution to a solution of the substance being assayed.
[Fr. titre, standard]

titration

/ti·tra·tion/ (ti-tra´shun) determination of a given component in solution by addition of a liquid reagent of known strength until the endpoint is reached when the component has been consumed by reaction with the reagent.

titration

[tītrā′shən]
a method of estimating the amount of solute in a solution. The solution is added in small, measured quantities to a known volume of a standard solution until a reaction occurs, as indicated by a change in color or pH or the liberation of a chemical product.

titration

Medtalk The serial dilution of a substance of interest. See Checkerboard titration.

ti·tra·tion

(tī-trā'shŭn)
Volumetric analysis by addition of definite amounts of a test solution to a solution of the substance being assayed.
[Fr. titre, standard]

ti·tra·tion

(tī-trā'shŭn)
Volumetric analysis by addition of definite amounts of a test solution to a solution of the substance being assayed.
[Fr. titre, standard]

titration

1. in chemistry, the determination of a given component in solution by addition of a liquid reagent of known strength until a given end point, e.g. change in color, is reached indicating that the component has been consumed by reaction with the reagent.
2. in serology, the serial dilution of serum, often in two- or 10-fold steps to determine the highest dilution that still contains detectable amounts of antibody. The reciprocal of that dilution is referred to as the antibody titer of that serum.
3. in microbiology, the serial dilution of a suspension of microorganisms; each dilution, usually in replicas of 4 or 5, is then inoculated onto a substrate such as agar plate (bacteria) or cell culture (viruses) such that the number of organisms present in one or more of the higher dilutions can be accurately counted and used to infer the number of organisms in the original undiluted suspension.

Dean and Webb titration
a test for measuring antibody in which varying dilutions of antibody are mixed with a constant quantity of antigen; antibody activity is determined by the dilution in which flocculation occurs most rapidly, i.e. the end point.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the Australian soil set, titration curves were made using NaOH and HCl additions in a background of 0.
Barrow NJ, Cox VC (1990) A quick and simple method for determining the titration curve and estimating the lime requirement of soil.
For the chemiluminescent cPCR titration curve, amplification reactions involving a constant amount of target DNA genome copies and increasing amounts of the competitor DNA genome copies were performed.
As in our study, Gillman and Bell (1976) found that the titration curve for the 1 M ionic strength solution was displaced to the acid side of the common intersection point, which they attributed to the release of aluminium from soil colloids in the high salt concentration solution.
Titration curves were constructed by plotting the potential change (from the initial baseline value) vs the concentration of added protamine.
We fitted protein-peptide titration curves also with equation 2, modified by adding a term linear to protein concentration.
For instance, real-time titration curves can offer some assistance when developing new methods.
Titration curves also confirmed that the reaction rate was linearly proportional to PDGF-BB concentration, up to the approximate point of PDGF-BB equivalence.
Large sized color graphics LCD displays real-time titration curves and differential curves to show reaction tendencies, etc.
The titration curves were used to predict the amount of acetic, malic, citric and phosphoric acids required to acidify fresh cucumber slurries with and without 0.
Figure 11 shows the pH titration curves for both fluorescein in solution and bead3 conjugated with fluorescein.
The mV values read in each titration were drawn against TBAH volumes (mL) added and potentiometric titration curves were formed for all the cases.