frame

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frame

 [frām]
a rigid supporting structure or a structure for immobilizing a part.
Balkan frame an apparatus for continuous extension in treatment of fractures of the femur, consisting of an overhead bar, with pulleys attached, by which the leg is supported in a sling.
Bradford frame a rectangular structure of gas pipe across which are stretched two strips of canvas, once used as a bed frame for patients with fractures or disease of the hip or spine.
quadriplegic standing frame a device for supporting in the upright position a patient whose four limbs are paralyzed.
Stryker frame see stryker frame.

frame

(frām),
A structure made of parts fitted together.

frame

(frām)
A supporting or integrating structure made of parts fitted together.

frame

A structure in metal, plastic, tortoiseshell, wood, leather, etc. for enclosing or supporting ophthalmic lenses but usually considered without the lenses. See spectacles.

frame

(frām)
A supporting or integrating structure made of parts fitted together.
References in periodicals archive ?
When he became an administrator, he started a timber framing program, erecting a replica of the barn that once stood next to the Salem Towne Jr.
Most period househunters are quite satisfied with a glimpse of some fairly plain, honest timber framing, however lowly its first owners or occupants might have been, and where there has been recent extension of an original half-timbered house, nobody makes too much fuss about the tellingly straight lines of the newer bits.
Most striking is the use of traditional timber framing to thoroughly practical effect, clad from floor to ceiling in bronzed glass to create an impressive studio.
He realized he would need help for such an effort, and local inquiries led to Webber and Kittleson--and the discovery of a tradition of utilitarian timber framing in a neighboring Amish community.
Timber framing the Wild Rose way is significantly different from the rough-hewn barn construction of the Amish.
Lower grade trees from these supply streams are perfectly suited for timber framing and do not compete with trim, flooring and furniture grade hardwoods.
Whether you go with traditional timber framing or (modern) "timber framing for the rest of us," you will discover certain advantages and disadvantages in both systems.
Timber framing by either method is strong in real structural terms.