TIGER

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TIGER

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Thousands of camera traps have helped conservationists track Nepal's wild tiger population, which has nearly doubled in recent years as the big cats claw their way back from the verge of extinction.
The population boost is the result of initiatives from the government, conservationists and local authorities who have worked for years to increase the tiger population in the Himalayan nation.
Tiger populations have plummeted from an estimated 100,000 a century ago to fewer than 4,000 in the wild today, as a result of poaching, habitat loss and conflict with humans, WWF said.
The groups teamed up to monitor the wild tiger population in Thailand by placing cameras in trees earlier in the year.
DISCOVERY Communications recently announced a historic partnership with World Wildlife Fund (WWF), through which Discovery will fund and help conserve nearly 1 million acres of protected habitat in India and Bhutan to protect and increase the wild tiger population. 'The global movement to protect tigers just got 1 million acres stronger,' said David Zaslav, president and CEO of Discovery Communications, who made the announcement.
San Francisco / Singapore, Oct 20, 2016 - (ACN Newswire) - Discovery Communications announced today a historic partnership with World Wildlife Fund (WWF) through which Discovery will fund and help conserve nearly 1 million acres of protected habitat in India and Bhutan to protect and increase the wild tiger population.
The organisations noted that wild tiger population has declined by over 95 per cent in the last 100 years while this year alone, there has been an upsurge in tiger poaching in India with more tigers killed in the first five months of 2016 than that in the whole of 2015.
Countries need to know their tiger populations and the threats they face, such as poaching for skins and body parts and loss of their habitat, in order to protect them, the charity argues.
WILD tiger populations are up after decades of decline, conservationists said yesterday.
Thailand is one of just 13 countries hosting fragile tiger populations -- estimated at fewer than 300 in the wild -- and is a hub of international smuggling.
Described in two published papers, the research provides evidence that recovery of wild tiger populations can be achieved hand-in-hand with meeting the livelihood aspirations of the Gujjars.