Tibetan medicine


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A health philosophy with features of ayurvedic medicine, in which medicine is linked to religion and incorporates good spirits, evil spirits and fate

Tibetan medicine

The traditional health care practices of Tibet, based primarily on the use of meditation, herbals, chanting, and other healing rituals.
See also: medicine
References in periodicals archive ?
Apart from the Men-Tsee-Khang, private amchi as well as smaller institutions of Tibetan medicine may not be willing to take the same step, and are, more often than not, financially unable to do so even if they wanted.
What You Can Do: To make contributions to support the conservation of medicinal flora and the practice of Tibetan medicine in Mustang, or for more information, contact TPP at the Earth Island Institute address or by e-mail at typei@earthisland.
NASDAQ: TBET) is an emerging specialty pharmaceutical company engaged in the research, development, manufacturing and marketing of modernized traditional Tibetan medicines in China.
Tibetan doctors employ the name khur mang, which is proper to the plant nomenclature of Tibetan medicine.
In China, traditional Tibetan medicine is not an alternative form of therapy but is used in the state-run hospitals alongside modern medicine.
It offers a linguistically and culturally Tibetan environment, a skilled, all-female staff of biomedically-trained Tibetan obstetricians and midwives, modern clinical facilities and equipment, and Tibetan medicine care and facilities.
This is the case with the healing arts of the Himalayas as illustrated at the Bodies In Balance: The Art of Tibetan Medicine exhibit recently presented in New York City by the Rubin Museum of Art.
The contribution of the Tibetan medicine is so good and so effective, because the medicines we are using are very natural, non-chemical and non-antibiotic.
Tibetan medicine providing traditional alternative healing system without side effects can work to fill the huge infrastructural gap.
28 developed on the foundations of Tibetan medicine, has been published in the July/August 2013 Journal of Cardiovascular Diseases and Diagnosis (JCDD) online.
The author argues that industrial production of these medicinal herbs triggers a profound transformation of the ways in which herbs are sourced, the ways in which medicines are produced and sold, and the perception of Tibetan medicine as a system of knowledge and practice.