Tibetan medicine


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A health philosophy with features of ayurvedic medicine, in which medicine is linked to religion and incorporates good spirits, evil spirits and fate
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Tibetan medicine

The traditional health care practices of Tibet, based primarily on the use of meditation, herbals, chanting, and other healing rituals.
See also: medicine
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Conditions that cannot be treated adequately are referred to the prefecture hospital and/or the Tibetan medicine hospital.
Regardless if healing art is ancient or contemporary, its power in the journey of Tibetan Medicine is indisputable.
An understanding of Buddhism is necessary to fully understand Tibetan medicine. The aim of Buddhist thought is to understand the nature of one's own mind, and to develop compassion and greater awareness.
The research included a total of thirty-eight days spent in the village of Hanu Gongma and a two-week trek following a practitioner of Tibetan medicine during collection of medicinal plants in the mountains of Zangskar.
While the form of Tibetan medical instruments--lancets for opening blood vessels, cases for carrying medicine or instruments--is practical, some of these artifacts feature fine design and ornamentation that convey the idea at the heart of traditional Tibetan medicine: that body and spirit are one.
The preliminary results indicated that xanthones from this Tibetan medicine, Halenia elliptica cause vasorelaxation in rat coronary artery.
The framework of Tibetan Buddhism and Tibetan Medicine offers a useful model for describing processes and experiences as "outer," "inner," and "secret." This paradigm is put into practice in our approach to Integrative Medicine at Amitabha.
Tibetan medicine student Barbara Soros presents Tenzin's Deer, a children's picturebook grounded in traditional Tibetan culture.
With close to 60 percent of health care costs borne by the consumer, there is a booming industry in traditional Chinese and Tibetan medicine, perhaps because the concepts and experience have met with success, or perhaps because it is a cheaper alternative to high-tech interventions.
For example, Chinese medicine is based on the perception of the energy of the cosmos and of the individual as a balance between the yin and the yang, whereas Tibetan medicine is based on an idea similar to the Hippocratic notion of the balance of humours.
The Goji berry has been used in traditional Mongolian and Tibetan medicine for centuries.