thunderclap headache


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to thunderclap headache: ice pick headache

thunderclap headache

sudden severe nonlocalizing head pain not associated with any abnormal neurologic findings; of varied etiology, including subarachnoid hemorrhage, migraine, carotid or vertebral artery dissection, cavernous sinus thrombosis, and idiopathic causes.
A distinct severe headache that occurs days to weeks before the index episode of intracranial bleeding, often from a subarachnoid haemorrhage—seen in 20% to 50% of patients; it develops within seconds, 'maxes' in minutes, and lasts for hours to days; the headache may be accompanied by nuchal rigidity, decreased consciousness, papilloedema, retinal haemorrhage, 3rd and/or 6th nerve palsy, bilateral leg weakness, nystagmus, ataxia, aphasia, abulia, hemiparesis, left-sided visual neglect
DiffDx Acute expansion, dissection, or thrombosis of unruptured aneurysm, venous sinus thrombosis, sexual headaches, benign thunderclap headache

thun·der·clap head·ache

(thŭn'dĕr-klap hed'āk)
Sudden severe nonlocalizing head pain not associated with any abnormal neurologic findings; of varied etiology, including subarachnoid hemorrhage, migraine, carotid or vertebral artery dissection, and cavernous sinus thrombosis.

thunderclap headache

A very severe headache that occurs suddenly and without warning. Such headaches may signify several dangerous possibilities including subarachnoid haemorrhage, intracerebral haemorrhage, subdural or epidural haematoma, acute ischaemic stroke, dissection of a vertebral or carotid artery, pituitary apoplexy or a cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. More commonly, the thunderclap headache implies nothing more grave than a migraine or a benign sexual headache.

thun·der·clap head·ache

(thŭn'dĕr-klap hed'āk)
Sudden severe nonlocalizing head pain not associated with any abnormal neurologic findings; of varied etiology.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nimodipine for treatment of primary thunderclap headache. Neurology.
Diagnostic outcome of patients presenting with severe thunderclap headache at Saidu teaching hospital.
A thunderclap headache was an isolated symptom in 10% of patients with SAH.
Women presenting with hypertension in association with refractory and/or thunderclap headaches, visual disturbances, or neurologic deficits should be evaluated for possible cerebrovascular complications such as reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), cerebral venous thrombosis, or stroke.
She had also fallen in her early 20s, cracking her head, and she suffered from thunderclap headaches.
Migraine 'cure' drug A SELF-injected smart drug holds out new hope for migraine sufferers who until now have had to grit and bear the pain of thunderclap headaches.
Thunderclap headaches are often described as being the "worst headache of my life" and can be a symptom of life-threatening problems like brain bleeding.
Thunderclap headaches, headaches radiating to the neck, and temporal headaches in an older individual are the examples of headaches where imaging may be helpful.