thrombospondin

(redirected from Thrombospondins)

thrombospondin

(throm″bō-spon′dĭn),

TSP

A glycoprotein that prevents cell-to-cell adhesion and angiogenesis. Thrombospondin is secreted by some parasites and may enhance their ability to cause disease. It is also found in malignant tumors, where it may block tumor growth and metastasis.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The ubiquitous cell surface glycoprotein CD47 (integrin-associated protein) is an important regulator of integrin function, but it also interacts with other proteins, such as thrombospondins (TSP) and signal regulatory proteins (SIRP).
[11.] Bentley AA, Adams JC (2010) The evolution of thrombospondins and their ligand-binding activities.
A homogenous, hyaluronic acid- (HA-) based, relatively loose form of ECM enwraps cell bodies, dendrites, and synapses of most neurons within the brain and may serve as a reservoir for proteins including thrombospondins and guidance molecules [1, 2].
MacLauchlan, "The role of thrombospondins in wound healing, ischemia, and the foreign body reaction," Journal of Cell Communication and Signaling, vol.
Lawler, "The interaction of Thrombospondins with extracellular matrix proteins," Journal of Cell Communication and Signaling, vol.
Bornstein, "Thrombospondins as matricellular modulators of cell function," Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol.
Detmar, "The role of VEGF and thrombospondins in skin angiogenesis," Journal of Dermatological Science, vol.
Thrombospondins are secreted proteins that include signature TSP-1 domains and are known to mediate target recognition by CD36 (Majai et al, 2006).
They describe comparison of the regulation of lymphatic and blood vessel development; key molecular regulators of angiogenesis; antiangiogenic agents such as thrombospondins and semaphorins; the role of the tumor microenvironment; blood vessel normalization for facilitating drug delivery; vascular pathologies such as hemangiomas, preeclampsia, and arteriovenous malformation, as well as the role of polymorphisms, integrins, and disruption of EC-EC junctions; and a critique of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy, based on clinical trial information.
Stokes et al., "Thrombospondins are astrocyte-secreted proteins that promote CNS synaptogenesis," Cell, vol.
Lawler, "The thrombospondins," The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology, vol.