threshold

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threshold

 [thresh´old]
1. the level that must be reached for an effect to be produced, as the degree of intensity of stimulus that just produces a sensation.
2. that value at which a stimulus just produces a sensation, is just appreciable, or comes just within the limits of perception.
auditory threshold the slightest perceptible sound.
threshold of consciousness the lowest limit of sensibility; the point of consciousness at which a stimulus is barely perceived.
defibrillation threshold DFT; the minimum amount of energy in joules that will consistently terminate ventricular fibrillation.
fibrillation threshold the least intensity of an electrical impulse that will cause cardiac tissue to begin fibrillation.
pacing threshold the minimal electrical stimulus required to produce consistent cardiac depolarization.
renal threshold that concentration of a substance (threshold substance) in plasma at which it begins to be excreted in the urine.
sensing threshold in cardiac pacing terminology, the voltage of the minimum signal that consistently activates pulse generator function.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

thresh·old

(thresh'ōld), Avoid the misspelling/mispronunciation threshhold.
1. The point at which a stimulus first produces a sensation.
2. The lower limit of perception of a stimulus.
3. The minimal stimulus that produces excitation of any structure, for example, the minimal stimulus eliciting a motor response.
Synonym(s): limen (2) [TA]
[A.S. therxold]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

threshold

(thrĕsh′ōld′, -hōld′)
n.
The point that must be exceeded to begin producing a given effect or result or to elicit a response: a low threshold of pain.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

threshold

Medtalk The point, stage, or degree of intensity at which a particular effect occurs or action is taken. See Therapeutic threshold, Transfusion threshold.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

thresh·old

(thresh'ōld)
1. The level of intensity at which a stimulus first produces a sensation.
2. The lower limit of perception of a stimulus.
3. The minimal stimulus that produces excitation of any structure.
4. Synonym(s): limen.
[A.S. therxold]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

threshold

the level at which a STIMULUS results in a response and below which there is no response despite the application of a stimulus.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

threshold 

The value of a stimulus that just produces a response. Syn. limen.
absolute threshold The minimum luminance of a source that will produce a sensation of light. It varies with the state of dark adaptation, the retinal area stimulated, the wavelength of light, etc. Syn. light threshold. See photochromatic interval.
contrast threshold See differential threshold.
corneal touch threshold See corneal touch threshold.
differential threshold The smallest difference between two stimuli presented simultaneously that gives rise to a perceived difference in sensation. The difference may be related to brightness, but also to colour and specifically to either saturation (while hue is kept constant) or hue (while saturation is kept constant). The differential threshold of luminance is equal to about 1% in photopic vision. Syn. contrast threshold (if the difference is one of luminance); just noticeable difference (jnd). See Weber's law; contrast sensitivity.
light threshold See absolute threshold.
movement threshold 1. The minimum motion of an object that can be perceived. 2. The speed at which an object moving between two points just appears to be moving. See hyperacuity; phi movement.
resolution threshold See limit of resolution.
stereo-threshold See stereoscopic visual acuity.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

thresh·old

(thresh'ōld) Avoid the misspelling threshhold.
1. Point at which a stimulus first produces a sensation.
2. Lower limit of perception of a stimulus.
[A.S. therxold]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
"We were able to show that a simple fixed threshold worked well in our study's very diverse sample, which improves the generalizability of our results," a coauthor said in a statement.
States have adopted a variety of measuring periods to calculate the thresholds. Most states have opted to look at the current and/or prior calendar year, but some measure based on a rolling twelve months of activity or examine the prior twelve-month period each quarter.
The adjustment based on nominal GDP growth ensures that the thresholds maintain their real value over time and relative to the size of the economy,' Balisacan said.
For the size of person (SoP) or value of assets or revenues of the ultimate parent entity of at least one of the parties, the PCC increased the threshold to P5.6 billion from P5 billion.
The thresholds are used to determine if a transaction triggers premerger reporting requirements to the PCC.
Pete James, Thresholds; Philip Singleton, Colmore BID; Stacey Barnfield, Edwin Ellis Creative Media
For the patient with a difference of 0.500 V and 0.625 V between ACap™ and manual thresholds, absolute pacing thresholds were 0.750 V, 2.375 V for ACap™ method and 0.25 V, 3.00 V for manual method, and automatic adjustment output voltage was 1.75 V, 4.375 V separately.
They rely on the data collected from the development vehicles, post-processing of the data yields the zone division, the worse cases of normal firing and misfiring events, the associated distributions, and the best areas to set thresholds. For example, if Figure 1 is the test data collected from a development vehicle in the zone of engine speed [1000 RPM, 1500 RPM] and load [10%, 15%].
The thresholds make it clear that the total home budget needed by the poor in NCR is roughly split 50:50 between food and nonfood items.
This is a longer-than-average displacement, but displaced thresholds of a few hundred feet are quite common due to obstacle clearance requirements on approach.
The strategy for choosing thresholds occurs over several steps.