Three Humors

Three Humors

Tibetan medicine
Those three components which, in the Tibetan construct of the universe, are present in all living things:
▪ Wind (linked to respiration and movement); 
▪ Bile (linked to digestion, skin complexion and emotion); and
▪ Phlegm (linked to joint mobility, skin elasticity and sleep).
References in periodicals archive ?
I was personally confounded by how the Greeks came up with the notion of Black Bile, which unlike the other three humors doesn't immediately strike a modern reader as having any obvious physiological substances to correlate it with.
They can also research the other three humors (yellow gall, blood and phlegm) and the symbols that represented each fluid.
In The Prince he speaks of a political body whose humors are unbalanced and needs severe medical treatment; in the Discorsi he portrays the good republic in which the humors of the plebs and the humors of the patricians are kept in balance through a healthy conflict and hopes that in the future someone "piu amato dal Cielo" can put into practice what he could only put in paper; in the Florentine Histories he describes a body politic full of malignant humors that seems to be beyond cure unless, as he says in the Discursus Florentinarum rerum, a truly good and prudent man succeeds, with heavens' help, in introducing a political constitution that gives the three humors of the city - the primi, the mezzani and the ultimi - their proper place.