thought broadcasting

(redirected from Thought broadcast)

thought

 [thawt]
the result or product of thinking.
thought broadcasting the belief that one's thoughts are being broadcast from one's head to the external world.
thought disorder a disturbance in the thought process that is most narrowly defined as disorganized thinking with altered associations, as is characteristic of schizophrenia. The term is often used much more broadly to include any disturbance of thought, such as confusion, hallucinations, or delusions, which affects possession, quantity, or content of thought.
thought stopping a method of overcoming obsessive, phobic, or otherwise distressing thoughts by first concentrating on them and after a short time stopping or interrupting them.

thought broad·cast·ing

the delusion of experiencing one's thoughts, as they occur, as being broadcast from one's head to the external world where other people can hear them.

thought broadcasting

/thought broad·cast·ing/ (thawt brawd´kas-ting) the feeling that one's thoughts are being broadcast to the environment.

thought broadcasting

[thôt]
Etymology: AS, thot
a symptom of psychosis in which the patient believes that his or her thoughts are "broadcast" beyond the head so that other people can hear them.
A symptom of schizophrenia in which a patient reports hearing the thoughts of others, being able to broadcast his/her own thoughts, and hear thoughts or voices where none exist. Specific manifestations may include a paranoid belief that thoughts are being recorded and re-broadcast by a radio or by a voice outside one’s heads. When thought broadcasting occurs regularly, it begins to affect behaviour and interferes with the person's ability to function in society

thought broad·cast·ing

(thawt brawdkast-ing)
Delusion of experiencing one's thoughts, as they occur, as being broadcast from one's head to the external world where other people can hear them.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fidelma, who worked for the Nuneaton Evening Telegraph's sister paper, the Weekly Tribune, for more than three years, will present a series of six Pause for Thought broadcasts on BBC Radio 2, starting on Saturday.