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gray

 [gra]
the SI unit of absorbed radiation dose, defined as the transfer of 1 joule of energy per kilogram of absorbing material (1 J/kg); 1 gray equals 100 rads.

gray (Gy),

(grā),
The SI unit of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation, equivalent to 1 J/kg of tissue; 1 Gy = 100 rad.
Synonym(s): griseus
[Louis H. Gray, British radiologist, 1905-1965]
Radiation oncology noun The SI unit for radiation, based on actual radiation absorption, as measured by a thermoluminescent dosimeter placed within a patient or a phantom; 1 Gy is equal to 1 joule/kg of absorber, roughly equivalent to 100 rads
Vox populi adjective Referring to an older person, usually at or near the age of retirement

gray

Gy Radiation physics The SI unit for radiation, based on actual radiation absorption, as measured by a thermoluminescent dosimeter placed within a Pt or a phantom; 1 Gy is equal to 1 joule/kg of absorber–100 rads

gray

(grā)
The SI unit of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation, equivalent to 1 J/kg of tissue; 1 Gy = 100 rad.
[Louis H. Gray, British radiologist, 1905-1965]

gray

A unit of absorbed dose of radiation equal to an energy absorption of 1 Joule per kilogram of irradiated material. 1 Gy is equivalent to 100 RADS. In radiotherapy, radiation is commonly applied to the area of the tumour in a dosage of around 2 Gy a day, five days a week for periods of 3–6 weeks.

gray

(Gy) (grā)
The SI unit of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation, equivalent to 1 J/kg of tissue; 1 Gy = 100 rad.
[Louis H. Gray, British radiologist, 1905-1965]
References in periodicals archive ?
"Changing Perspectives on the Past: The Reception of Thomas Gray's The Bard." CLIO 3.3 (1974): 315-329.
Thomas Gray was the child of his time in the use of poetic diction and personification.
Thomas Gray has represented the State of Arkansas admirably and capably in all of his achievements both locally and nationally.
Gleckner, Gray Agonistes: Thomas Gray and Masculine Friendship (1997), Mack temperately argues the case for homoerotic allusions in Gray's work, handling the topic, which was confined by Ketton-Cremer to dark hints about "secrets" and "temptations," with an admirable sense of proportion.
Thomas Gray's abhorrence of both public attention and London's literary marketplace in Grub Street stands in contrast to the models of nationalism offered by Anderson and Newman.
Undoubtedly, Western literatures constitute one of the important sources in al-Mala'ika's education; they left their mark in some of her works as is evident in her uses of borrowed images and symbols, her allusions to John Keats and other Western poets, and her translation of poems by Byron, Thomas Gray, and Rupert Brooke and others.
It is fortunate for current readers of eighteenth-century poetry that Thomas Gray was on close terms with fellow poet William Mason.
Just such a work is this: the series, 'The Nineteenth Century' from Scolar Press; the general editor, Vincent Newey (with Joanne Shattock) of the University of Leicester; the broadly unifying title, Centring the Self, with a subtitle arching from Thomas Gray to Thomas Hardy - Gray (and Cowper) being granted honorary nineteenth-century status.
Among his subjects for biography were the poet William Cowper (The Stricken Deer, 1929), Jane Austen (1935), Lord Melbourne (The Young Melbourne, 1939), Thomas Hardy (Hardy the Novelist, 1943), the poet Thomas Gray (Two Quiet Lives, 1948), and the writer and caricaturist Sir Max Beerbohm (Max, 1964).
The Ossianic poems, compared at the time to the works of Homer, could move the poet Thomas Gray to write, " Imagination dwelt many hundred years ago in all her pomp on the cold and barren mountains of Scotland.
Thornhill's Harry Marchbank co-drove Thomas Gray to eighth place in their Mitsubishi Evo 9.
He will now go into an end-of-season shoot-out with Thomas Gray, Greg McKnight and four others to win free entry to a top European event.