thiopentone sodium

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thiopentone sodium

Thiopental, a barbiturate drug widely used as a pleasant and rapid induction agent for general anaesthesia. The drug is given by slow intravenous injection. The drug is on the WHO official list. A brand name is Thiopental.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
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Thiopentone sodium is one of the most widely drug in the induction of general anesthesia (Krauss and Green, 2000) and it is an ultra-short acting barbiturate, immediately after intravenous injection, thiopental rapidly reaches the CNS, and its effects become apparent within 15-30 sec and duration of anaesthesia is 10-20 min (Andaluz et al., 2012; Goldstein and Aronow, 1960).
Comparative Study On Haemodynamic Responses During Intubation Using Etomidate, Propofol And Thiopentone In Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy Surgeries.
Usefulness of propofol to prevent succinylcholine induced fasciculations and myalgia a comparison with thiopentone sodium as an induction agent.
Propofol is more expensive and its onset is slower than thiopentone sodium but recovery is quick.
The influence of induction agent (thiopentone and propofol) on PONV is summarized in Table 3.
Two agents that are not usually associated with ototoxicity--oxytocin and thiopentone sodium--were found to be ototoxic in our study (1 case each).
While short-acting intravenous agents, such as propofol, methohexitone and thiopentone, are used in general anaesthesia for ECT, a short-acting opioid can also be added to these agents to prolong seizure duration, increase seizure quality and reduce haemodynamic responses to ECT (1-7).
Anaesthesia was induced with Injection Thiopentone in a dose of 5 mg / kg body weight I/V.
These include common drugs such as diazepam, ketamine, pancuronium, thiopentone, enflurane and etomodate.
Etomidate is, however, a cardio-stable drug with many advantages in the emergency setting over a number of the other rapid-sequence intubation induction agents, such as propofol and thiopentone. It would be prudent to examine the evidence carefully before throwing the 'baby' (etomidate) out with the 'bathwater' (putative evidence to avoid this drug in all shocked patients in emergency departments).