thickening agent

(redirected from Thickening agents)

thickening agent

Any substance added to a liquid to increase its viscosity without substantially altering its other properties (e.g., taste, clarity) or its responses to chemical (e.g., altered pH) or physical conditions (e.g., low temperatures).
References in periodicals archive ?
Fracking fluid is primarily composed of water, along with other thickening agents, and is used to create cracks in shale rocks.
Solvents, Plasticizers, Preservatives, Static Preventive, Stearates, Surface Conditioners & Lubricants, Thickening Agents, Waxes
All three are 100 percent natural and free from preservatives, artificial colouring and thickening agents.
Surfactants, Silicone Fluids, Silicone Blends, Emulsifiers, Thickening Agents, Preservatives, Neutralizers, Elastomer, Blends, Emulsions; Vitamins, Sunscreens, Conditioning Agents, Film-Formers, Emollients, Natural Oils
Glyndwer's expertise in using biopolymers as rheology modifiers, or thickening agents which affect the consistency of materials, will be crucial for the effective delivery of the pheromones and the controlled release technology.
Salad dressings are emulsions-they contain oil and water; and to keep these ingredients together in one phase, manufacturers rely on emulsifiers and thickening agents to avoid thinning of the dressing and separation of the oil and water phase," she said.
Additives Offered: anti-flooding agents, anti-foaming agents, antioxidants, anti-rust agents, anti-sagging agents, anti-settling agents, anti-skinning agents, catalysts, corrosion inhibitors, dispersing agents, flow control agents, suspension agents, thickening agents
The haul is believed to be owned by English and Irish drug barons who paid more than pounds 6million for it - its street value would multiply when it is mixed with thickening agents.
The chillies are then blended into high-quality sauces and bottled, without using additives or thickening agents.
Nutrient contribution of infant cereals used as fluid thickening agents in diets to feed the elderly.
Seaweed is harvested commercially in 35 countries worldwide, bringing in an estimated $5 billion to $6 billion in sales for medicine, as gelling and thickening agents or in cosmetics and fertilizer, according to a report prepared by Laurel Hillmann, coastal resource planner.
An extensive introductory section teaches aspiring chefs all about different types of spices, seasonings, thickening agents, souring agents, and the elements of a traditional Indian meal, in this "must-have" cookbook especially recommended for anyone interested in creating original Indian-style creations as well as preparing tasty tidbits according to recipe.