thermoreceptor

(redirected from Thermoreceptors)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Thermoreceptors: Nociceptors, Nocireceptors

thermoreceptor

 [ther″mo-re-sep´tor]
a nerve ending sensitive to stimulation by heat.

ther·mo·re·cep·tor

(ther'mō-rē-sep'tŏr, -tōr),
A receptor that is sensitive to heat.

thermoreceptor

(thûr′mō-rĭ-sĕp′tər)
n.
A sensory receptor that responds to heat and cold.

ther·mo·re·cep·tor

(thĕr'mō-rĕ-sep'tŏr)
A receptor that is sensitive to heat.

thermoreceptor

A sensory receptor that responds to heat.

thermoreceptor

a sensory nerve ending which is responsive to temperature change.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The infrared receptor of Melanophila acuminata De Geer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae): ultrastructural study of a unique insect thermoreceptor and its possible descent from a hair mechanoreceptor.
Available in cool caplets, geltabs, and gelcaps, Allergy Complete Multisymptom additionally features a coating of CoolBurst, which uses CoolTek technology to stimulate thermoreceptors in the mouth and throat to create a cooling sensation.
The feeling of increased nasal patency may be mediated by thermoreceptors in the nasal vestibule, according to investigators Dr.
The mechanoreceptors respond to indentations of the skin; the thermoreceptors to specific temperatures and changes in temperature; and the nociceptors to intense pressure or high heat.
The hypothesis that thermoreceptors may demonstrate faster adaptations to persistent pain than mechanoreceptors is supported by evidence of thermal allodynia within 1 day of experimentally induced injury in non-primate animals, whereas mechanical allodynia either developed gradually up to 30 days after injury or was not present [22, 23].
The somatic nervous system collects sensory data from skin thermoreceptors as well as from the internal organs through the blood stream, evaluates this data, and yields a thermal comfort response after processing the data based on the psychological state.
The pulsing airflow increased the cooling effectiveness of the airflow by preventing the acclimatization of the thermoreceptors. Subjects expressed satisfaction with the airflow in all metabolic and temperature conditions.
elegans, it has been shown, by ablating one of the pair of amphidial chemoreceptors or thermoreceptors, that signals from lateral receptors may be pooled for nematode chemotaxis or thermotaxis (Bargmann and Horvitz, 1991; Bargmann et al., 1993; Mori and Ohshima, 1995).