thermoregulation

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Related to Thermophysiology: Poikilothermy

thermoregulation

 [ther″mo-reg″u-la´shun]
1. heat regulation.
ineffective thermoregulation a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual's temperature fluctuates between hypothermia and hyperthermia.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ther·mo·reg·u·la·tion

(ther'mō-reg'yū-lā'shŭn),
Temperature control, as by a thermostat.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

thermoregulation

(thûr′mō-rĕg′yə-lā′shən)
n.
Maintenance of a constant internal body temperature independent from the environmental temperature: mammalian thermoregulation.

ther′mo·reg′u·la·to′ry (-rĕg′yə-lə-tôr′ē) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ther·mo·reg·u·la·tion

(thĕr'mō-reg'yū-lā'shŭn)
1. Temperature control, as by a thermostat.
2. Maintenance of body temperature through physiologic mechanisms governed by the hypothalamus.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

thermoregulation

The control of body temperature and its maintenance within narrow limits in spite of factors tending to change it.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

thermoregulation

the control of body heat in HOMOIOTHERMS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"The influence of local effects on thermal sensation under non-uniform environmental conditions--Gender differences in thermophysiology, thermal comfort and productivity during convective and radiant cooling." Physiology & behaviour 107(2): 252-261.
The IESD-Fiala model of thermal comfort and thermophysiology (Fiala et al 1999) is used in this work to predict the response of a typical human figure to the local environment around the body predicted by CFD.