thermophile

(redirected from Thermophiles)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Related to Thermophiles: halophiles

thermophile

 [ther´mo-fīl]
a microorganism that grows best at elevated temperatures. adj., adj thermophil´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ther·mo·phile

, thermophil (ther'mō-fīl, -fil),
An organism that thrives at a temperature of 50°C or higher.
[thermo- + G. phileō, to love]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

thermophile

(thûr′mə-fīl′)
n.
Any of various organisms, such as certain bacteria, requiring temperatures between 45°C and 80°C to thrive.

ther′mo·phil′ic (-fĭl′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ther·mo·phile

, thermophil (thĕr'mō-fīl, -fil)
Any organism that thrives at a temperature of 50°C or higher.
[thermo- + G. phileō, to love]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Rawat, "Metal-tolerant thermophiles: metals as electron donors and acceptors, toxicity, tolerance and industrial applications," Environmental Science and Pollution Research, vol.
lactis (CNCM strain number I-1631); 1.5 x [10.sup.10] colony-forming unit CFU of Lactobacillus acidophilus; 1.5 x [10.sup.10] colonyforming unit CFU of Streptococcus thermophiles; 1.5 x [10.sup.10] colony-forming unit CFU of Lactobacillus plantarum; 1.5 x [10.sup.10] colony-forming unit CFU of Bifidobacterium lactis (CNCM I-2494); 1.5 x 1 1010 colony-forming unit CFU of Lactobacillus reuteri (DSM 17938), maltodextrin from corn, anticaking agent (silica), casein, lactose, and gluten < 3 ppm LLOQ (lower limit of quantitation), (Biocult strong, HOMEOSYN, Rome, Italy).
Kawarabayasi, Thermophilic microbes in environmental and industrial biotechnology: Biotechnology of Thermophiles, Springer, Netherlands, Amsterdam, 2nd edition, 2014.
Among their topics are the diversity of thermophilic microorganisms and their roles in the carbon cycle, lignocellulosic biomass deconstruction by the extremely thermophilic genus Caldicellulosiruptor, alcohol dehydrogenases and their physiological functions in hyperthermophiles, DNA replication in thermophilic microorganisms, the metabolic engineering of thermophiles for biofuel production, and thermophilic viruses and their association with thermophiles.
Organisms that thrive in hot environments, known as thermophiles, would have fared better than anything that needed lower temperatures, says Sumner.
Isolation of cellulolytic anaerobic extreme thermophiles from New Zealand thermal sites.
Whole milk without any standardisation was used for the manufacturing of yoghurt using Strepotococcus thermophiles and Lactobacillus bulgaricus starter culture (Abdullah et al., 2012).
The author concluded that the alleviation in bowel symptoms was attributable to Bifidobacterium lactis, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Streptococcus thermophiles. So, let's tell patients to look for probiotics with these species.
Twelve ate a fermented milk product (about 125 g/ 4.38 oz twice a day) containing Bifidobacterium animalis subsp Lactis, Streptococcus thermophiles, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, and Lactococcus lactis subsp Lactis for 4 weeks.
* Check the ingredient list on yogurt and kefir containers; any probiotics that have been added will be listed (for example, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Streptococcus thermophiles).
Look for probiotics labeled Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Streptococcus thermophiles in products containing probiotics.