thermometer

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thermometer

 [ther-mom´ĕ-ter]
an instrument for determining temperatures, in principle making use of a substance (such as alcohol or mercury) with a physical property that varies with temperature and is susceptible of measurement on some defined scale.
Temperatures on Celsius and Fahrenheit thermometers related to temperature ranges. From Elkin et al., 2000.
axilla thermometer a clinical thermometer that is placed in the axilla.
Celsius thermometer one that uses the Celsius scale.
centigrade thermometer one having the interval between two established reference points divided into 100 equal units, such as the Celsius thermometer.
clinical thermometer one used to determine the temperature of the human body.
electronic thermometer a clinical thermometer that uses a sensor based on thermistors, solid-state electronic devices whose electrical characteristics change with temperature. The reading is recorded within seconds, some having a red light or other device to indicate when maximum temperature is reached. Available models include hand-held, desk-top, and wall-mounted units, all having probes that are inserted orally or rectally.
Fahrenheit thermometer one that uses the Fahrenheit scale.
Kelvin thermometer one that uses the Kelvin scale.
oral thermometer a clinical thermometer whose mercury containing bulb is placed under the tongue.
recording thermometer a temperature-sensitive instrument by which the temperature to which it is exposed is continuously recorded.
rectal thermometer a clinical thermometer that is inserted in the rectum.
resistance thermometer one that uses the electric resistance of metals (thermocouple) to determine temperature.
self-registering thermometer
2. one that registers the maximum or minimum temperature attained in the measurement.
tympanic thermometer an electronic clinical thermometer that gives a digital reading in less than two seconds. Second-generation tympanic thermometers work by monitoring the temperature when the ear opening is sealed.

ther·mom·e·ter

(ther-mom'ĕ-tĕr),
An instrument for indicating the temperature of any substance; often a sealed vacuum tube containing mercury, which expands with heat and contracts with cold, its level accordingly rising or falling in the tube, with the exact degree of variation of level being indicated by a scale, or, more recently, a device with an electronic sensor that displays the temperature without the use of mercury.
See also: scale.
[thermo- + G. metron, measure]

thermometer

/ther·mom·e·ter/ (ther-mom´ĕ-ter) an instrument for determining temperatures, in principle making use of a substance with a physical property that varies with temperature and is susceptible of measurement on some defined scale.
clinical thermometer  one used to determine the temperature of the human body.
infrared tympanic thermometer  a clinical thermometer inserted into the external acoustic meatus to determine the body temperature by measuring the infrared radiation emanating from the tympanic membrane.
oral thermometer  a clinical thermometer that is placed under the tongue.
recording thermometer  a temperature-sensitive instrument by which the temperature to which it is exposed is continuously recorded.
rectal thermometer  a clinical thermometer that is inserted into the rectum.
tympanic thermometer  infrared tympanic t.

thermometer

(thər-mŏm′ĭ-tər)
n.
An instrument for measuring temperature, especially one having a graduated glass tube with a bulb containing a liquid, typically mercury or colored alcohol, that expands and rises in the tube as the temperature increases.

thermometer

[thermom′ətər]
Etymology: Gk, thermē + metron, measure
an instrument for measuring temperature. Originally, it consisted of a sealed glass tube marked in degrees Celsius or Fahrenheit and contained liquid such as mercury or alcohol. The liquid rises or falls as it expands or contracts according to changes in temperature. See also air thermometer, clinical thermometer, electronic thermometer, mercury thermometer, rectal thermometer, surface thermometer, tympanic membrane thermometer, wet-and-dry-bulb thermometer.

ther·mom·e·ter

(thĕr-mom'ĕ-tĕr)
An instrument for indicating the temperature of any substance; formerly a sealed vacuum tube containing mercury, which expands with heat and contracts with cold, its level accordingly rising or falling in the tube, with the exact degree of variation of level being indicated by a scale, but increasingly a digital apparatus.
See also: scale
[thermo- + G. metron, measure]

thermometer

A device for registering body temperature. Thermometers may be analogue, as in the case of the common mercury expansion thermometer or colour-change devices, or may have a digital display.

ther·mom·e·ter

(thĕr-mom'ĕ-tĕr)
An instrument for indicating temperature of any substance; often sealed vacuum tube containing mercury, which expands with heat and contracts with cold, its level accordingly rising or falling in the tube, with exact degree of variation of level being indicated by a scale, or, today, a device with an electronic sensor that displays temperature without use of mercury.
[thermo- + G. metron, measure]

thermometer,

n instrument used for taking temperature readings. Varying designs of the thermometer allow the temperature to be taken in the oral cavity, rectum, or externally at the axillary or groin areas.
thermometer, external,
n a reading from a thermometer taken at an external location (the armpit or groin) instead of by an internal method (the oral cavity or rectum).
thermometer, rectal,
n a thermometer used to take temperature readings by insertion into the rectum of the patient.

thermometer

an instrument for determining temperatures, in principle making use of a substance (such as alcohol or mercury) with a physical property that varies with temperature and is susceptible of measurement on some defined scale.

Celsius thermometer
one employing the Celsius scale, that is, with the ice point at 0 (0°C) and the normal boiling point of water at 100 degrees (100°C).
centigrade thermometer
one having the interval between two established reference points divided into 100 equal units, as the Celsius thermometer.
clinical thermometer
one used to determine the temperature of the patient in clinical situations.
electronic thermometer
a clinical thermometer using a sensor based on thermistors, solid-state electronic devices whose electrical characteristics change with temperature. The reading is recorded within seconds, some having a red light or other device to indicate when maximum temperature is reached. Available models include handheld, desk-top and wall-mounted units, all having probes that are inserted orally or rectally. It is expected that electronic thermometers worn by the patient will have some use.
Fahrenheit thermometer
one employing the Fahrenheit scale, that is, with the ice point at 32 and the normal boiling point of water at 212 degrees (212°F).
Kelvin thermometer
one employing the kelvin scale.
recording thermometer
a temperature-sensitive instrument by which the temperature to which it is exposed is continuously recorded.
rectal thermometer
a clinical thermometer that is inserted in the rectum for determining body temperature.
resistance thermometer
one that uses the electric resistance of metals for determining temperature (thermocouple).
self-registering thermometer
recording thermometer.
References in classic literature ?
I next boiled the thermometer, and got a most excellent result; the mercury went up to about 200 degrees Fahrenheit.
The thermometer stands now at fifty- five, but if there’s any vartue in good maple wood, I’ll weather upon it, before one glass, as much as ten points more, so that the squire, when he comes home from Betty Hollister’s warm room, will feel as hot as a hand that has given the rigging a lick with bad tar.
The temperature shown by the political thermometer to the company that evening was this:
I sat with my eyes glued to the thermometer and the distance meter.
He dosed himself with chlorodyne, took his own pulse, smoked a thermometer, and lay back on the couch with a suppressed groan.
If I was you, Daylight, I wouldn't mush to-day," Joe Hines counselled, coming in from consulting the spirit thermometer outside the door.
And you're responsible for it, what of your MAN, who is always the erected, the vitalized inorganic, the latest of the ephemera, the creature of temperature strutting his little space on the thermometer.
Seventy-four below zero by spirit thermometer on the sled.
Fortunately, when winter snow falls in the Northland the thermometer invariably rises; so, instead of the customary forty and fifty and even sixty degrees below zero, the temperature remained fifteen below.
300,000 times weaker than that of the sun, and that its heat has no appreciable effect upon the thermometer.
We dined at Mandetiba; the thermometer in the shade being 84 degs.
Well, I suppose it 'got in' through the bevelled edge of that glass thermometer in the window," he said wearily.