thermoluminescent dosimeter


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ther·mo·lu·mi·nes·cent do·sim·e·ter

(TLD) (thĕr'mō-lū-mi-nes'ĕnt dō-sim'ĕ-tĕr)
Device resembling a film badge but that uses lithium fluoride crystals instead of film to record radiation exposure.
See also: film badge
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

thermoluminescent dosimeter

(thĕr″mō-loo-mĭ-nĕs′ĕnt)
A monitoring device consisting of a small crystal in a container that can be attached to a patient or to a health care worker. It stores energy when struck by ionizing radiation. When heated, it will emit light proportional to the amount of radiation to which it has been exposed.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
using a film badge, optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeter, thermoluminescent dosimeter or pocket ionization chamber.
The newer optically stimulated luminescent dosimeter resembles and handles similarly to traditional film and thermoluminescent dosimeters and combines the best features of both while eliminating some of the disadvantages.
The physical method was based on film badge individual monitoring and irradiation of a simulator of a left hand containing thermoluminescent dosimeters. The biological method used the cytogenetic analysis and the computational method used the Brazilian Monte Carlo calculation code "Visual Monte Carlo Dose Calculation -VMC" with human body voxel simulator.
The absorbed doses for the operator's hand were calculated by using a left hand simulator with thermoluminescent dosimeters. This simulator was composed of a latex glove, internally filled with solid flakes of expanded polystyrene, which made it adjustable to the suitable format of the left hand.
Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are simple and inexpensive to utilize for this purpose in much of this imaging.
Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were positioned on the breast phantom surface at the 12 o'clock, 3 o'clock, and 6 o'clock positions; at the nipple level equivalent; and underneath the breast phantom on the chest wall.
Uncertainties in dose estimates in the worker cohorts are caused by sampling variation in measurements from film badges and thermoluminescent dosimeters, adjustments made to doses below the limit of detection, and attenuation of externally measured dose by shielding (Gilbert 1998; Gilbert and Fix 1995).
Monitoring is performed with personnel dosimeters such as pocket dosimeters, film badges and thermoluminescent dosimeters. The dose is measured at B-month intervals, referred to as a time-integrated dose.
1.) In a previous article,[4] we compared the DAP meter to thermoluminescent dosimeters in chest radiography and concluded that the DAP meter could be a convenient and accurate method of measuring the entrance skin exposure (ESE) with a known x-ray field size.