thermodynamics

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Related to Thermodynamic law: second law of thermodynamics, entropy

thermodynamics

 [ther″mo-di-nam´iks]
the branch of science dealing with heat, work, and energy, their interconversion, and problems related thereto.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ther·mo·dy·nam·ics

(ther'mō-dī-nam'iks),
1. The branch of physicochemical science concerned with heat and energy and their conversions one into the other involving mechanical work.
2. The study of the flow of heat.
[thermo- + G. dynamis, force]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ther·mo·dy·nam·ics

(thĕr'mō-dī-nam'iks)
1. The branch of physicochemical science concerned with heat and energy and their conversions of one into the other involving mechanical work.
2. The study of the flow of heat.
[thermo- + G. dynamis, force]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

thermodynamics

the science concerned with the relationships between heat and mechanical work. The laws of thermodynamics are:(1st) when one form of energy is converted to another there is no loss or gain.(2nd) when one form of energy is converted to another a proportion is turned into heat.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This result fails to satisfy thermodynamic laws without fitting within the range of 0/1.
An important question to ask when someone is selling a seemingly incredible energy plan or device is, "How do you explain this in light of the laws of thermodynamics?" If the technology is legitimate, there should be an explanation that acknowledges the thermodynamic laws and shows how energy is harnessed from some other source, with the total of matter and energy remaining the same.
Thermodynamic laws and properties of gases may be derived from a statistical description of molecular motion.

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