thermic effect of food

(redirected from Thermic effect)

thermic effect of food

,

TEF

The increase in the body's metabolic rate that is produced by the consumption, digestion, metabolism, and storage of food. Foods with relatively low thermic effects include most carbohydrates, since carbohydrates, esp. sugars, cost the body relatively little energy to digest and metabolize. Protein-rich meals have a higher TEF, which is the rationale for low-carbohydrate diets, such as the Atkins and South Beach diets. Synonym: specific dynamic action of food.
References in periodicals archive ?
Increased gluconeogenesis - the manufacture of blood sugar and the thermic effect of proteins.
However, the thermic effect of food will vary depending on the food type (how much carbohydrates, fat and protein it contains), as well as the person, based on their individual rate of absorption, activity level, age, gender, and weight.
For an average person, resting metabolic rate accounts for 70% of calories consumed, physical activity accounts for 20%, and energy required to digest and metabolize food (the thermic effect of food) accounts for 10%.
Enhanced thermic effect of food, postprandial NEFA suppression and raised adiponectin in obese women who eat slowly.
Protein-rich foods have a high thermic effect (the energy used in digestion, absorption and distribution of nutrients) which allows the body to burn more calories to digest it.
2004) take into consideration the thermic effect of food as well as the expenditure due to potential changes in physical activity.
Ashley Binns, a doctoral student in kinesiology and exercise science who led the study at the University of Arkansas, said the goal was to determine the interaction between the thermic effect of food and exercise on the body's total energy expenditure, as measured in calories.
Basal metabolic rate (BMR), physical activity thermogenesis, and thermic effect of food comprise total daily EE.
TRUTH There are some foods, such as fibrous vegetables and lean proteins, that have a high thermic effect and a low calorie density - which means much of the calories in these foods are burned off during digestion - but that's not the same as burning fat from your body.
Energy expenditure is a complex concept that is a result of multiple factors including posture, voluntary and involuntary physical activity, resting metabolic rate, and the thermic effect of feeding (the energy required in the digestion and absorption of food).
However, I have always had a theory that the thermogenic effect of solid, whole food proteins is higher than most people think and that solid whole food proteins have a higher thermic effect than liquids.
UCLA dietitian Dana Ellis, RD, explains that proteins have a higher thermic effect of food (TEF) than carbohydrates, meaning that the body requires more energy to process protein than carbohydrates.