coefficient of thermal expansion

(redirected from Thermal expansion coefficient)
Also found in: Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

coefficient of thermal expansion

The change in the dimensions of a material when its temperature is raised 1°C. In dentistry, if the relative expansion and contraction of restorative materials, casts, or appliances are not accounted for, the patient may have problems with improper fitting, microleakage, or adhesive debonding.
See also: coefficient
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
For alloy FeC at the same concentration of interstitial atoms when temperature increases, the thermal expansion coefficient [[alpha].sub.T] and the heat capacity at constant pressure [C.sub.P] increase.
Levin, "Thermal expansion coefficients of heterogeneous materials," Mekhanika Tverdogo, vol.
v is the longitudinal wave velocity, [rho] is the density, and [alpha] is the thermal expansion coefficient.
Along the steel pipe phase radius (Figure 5(a)), if the insulate coating is constituted by laminate glass (Case 2), the nondimensional equivalent stress assumes values smaller than the other cases (Cases 1 and 3), due to the fact that the linear thermal expansion coefficient of laminate glass is smaller than those of expanded polyurethane and syntactic foam.
In order to determine thermal expansion coefficient values, samples were heated in a dilatometer (Netzsch DIL 402 PC) at a rate of 10[degrees]C/min up to 600[degrees]C.
The stress in the films often results from epitaxy in the growth processes and from thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) mismatch in the postgrowth processes of both metal-organic chemical vapor deposition and hydride vapor phase epitaxy.
The austenitic grades are actually well-known to be more sensitive to cyclic oxidation than ferritic ones due to their higher thermal expansion coefficient once again.
In the case being studied in this work, results are affected by the ejection temperature and by the thermal expansion coefficient. As tests showed, this last parameter is not linear with respect to temperature and may vary significantly as the range of interest (temperature drop) changes.
The Al matrix has significantly higher thermal expansion coefficient and lower elastic modulus (from 23.5 to 26.5 x [10.sup.-6] [K.sup.-1] and 70 GPa) than both [Al.sub.4][C.sub.3] (5 x [10.sup.-6] [K.sup.-1], and 445 GPa) and [Al.sup.2][O.sup.3] (8.3 x [10.sup.-6] [K.sup.-1], and 393 GPa), respectively.
Thermal expansion coefficient is comparable to that of aluminum.
Thermal warping resulting from aluminum's thermal expansion coefficient (twice that of steel) is countermeasured with a longitudinal design bead that essentially absorbs the differences.
Low thermal expansion coefficient and high hot strength combine to give the material thermal shock resistance.

Full browser ?