conductivity

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conductivity

 [kon″duk-tiv´ĭ-te]
capacity for conduction.

con·duc·tiv·i·ty

(kon'dŭk-tiv'i-tē),
1. The power of transmission or conveyance of certain forms of energy, as heat, sound, and electricity, without perceptible motion in the conducting body.
2. The property, inherent in living protoplasm, of transmitting a state of excitation; for example, in muscle or nerve.

conductivity

(kŏn′dŭk-tĭv′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. conductivi·ties
1. The ability or power to conduct or transmit heat, electricity, or sound.
2. The conductance of a material.
3. Physiology The conductibility of a structure, especially the ability of a nerve to transmit a wave of excitation.

con·duc·tiv·i·ty

(kon'dŭk-tiv'i-tē)
1. The power of transmission or conveyance of certain forms of energy, such as heat, sound, and electricity, without perceptible motion in the conducting body.
2. The property, inherent in living protoplasm, of transmitting a state of excitation; e.g., in muscle or nerve.

conductivity

  1. the property of conducting an electric current.
  2. the passage of a physiological disturbance through tissue or a cell, as in a NERVE IMPULSE.

con·duc·tiv·i·ty

(kon'dŭk-tiv'i-tē)
The power of transmission or conveyance of energy, without perceptible motion in the conducting body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two technologies resulted in the development of carbon nanotube sheets with high thermal conductivity, compared to that of conventional materials, at a rate of 80 watts per meter-kelvin (W/mK), even when including contact resistance.
As to the filler particles with irregular shape but isotropic thermal conductivity, a predicting model of the filled polymer composites is as follows:
It has an important influence on the thermal conductivity of rock.
Curled flakes create large voids, and it was hoped that the kenaf's long fibers could fill these cavities and reduce the thermal conductivity.
Porosity has a significant influence on the thermal conductivity. Between the two aluminosilicate shells (#4 and #6), #6 with higher total porosity (37.65%) exhibited lower thermal conductivity values throughout the measured temperature range compared to shell #4 having lower total porosity (33.52%).
Thermal conductivity of Ti[O.sub.2]-DW nanofluids was conducted at temperatures of 27[degrees]C, 40[degrees]C, 50[degrees]C and 60[degrees]C.
Covestro's Marsco says both graphite and graphene have become commonly used, noting that graphite has a relatively low cost and moderate thermal conductivity, whereas graphene is generally higher cost but with significant thermal-conductivity performance advantages.
Although the thermal conductivity of Zr[O.sub.2] at 1500[degrees]C is still over 60% of its value at 25[degrees]C, it is still significantly lower than the thermal conductivities of the alumina ceramics and sapphire.
The lowest thermal conductivity coefficient was 1.32 W/mK at S1 sample with 0.75% aerogel content and 0.03% [Li.sub.2]C[O.sub.3] activator dosage.
Considering the theoretical background of thermal conductivity, some predictive models of thermal conductivity emerge.
Others studied the influence of metallurgical effect of Titanium and Boron on the thermal conductivity of Aluminium alloy.