theriac


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Related to theriac: Theriaca andromachi

theriac

Medical history
(1) A combination of herbs given by Roman physicians, which contained opiates and antispasmodics, administered as cure-alls.
(2) A mixture of substances with alleged therapeutic value, used in the Middle Ages as cure-all or an antidote to various poisons.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"The Export of Theriac from the Land of Israel and its Uses in the Middle Ages".
Craig Theriac: Scale Computing has been around since 2008, and we launched our HC3 product in 2012.
does not appear to have composed a treatise on theriac. For a list of
In a substantially revised version of his 2011 PhD dissertation at Exeter University, Leigh presents a new edition with commentary of a second-century Greek treatise concerned with the history, manufacture, and properties of the complex drug theriac or Galene, invented (according to the treatise) by Andromachus, personal physician to Nero, who took a recipe derived from Mithridates VI of Pontus and added the flesh of vipers to it.
Most recently, Dr Noronha worked as chief scientific officer of JW Theriac Inc, a pharmaceutical company focused on new drug research and development, which he joined in July 2011.
Da Gama himself caught an arrow in the leg and dressed his wound with a poultice of urine, olive oil and a theriac of supposedly helpful ingredients mixed with honey.
A very popular remedy for bodily pains and insomnia amongst the ancient authors was theriac, a mixture made of several ingredients, including poppy extract and snake venom (Siegel 1976:134).
However, it has recently been suggested that his pleasant nature was conditioned by opium addiction--the drug deriving from a daily dose of theriac, prescribed by his physician, Galen.
Galen, for instance, treated the melancholic emperor Marcus Aurelius with theriac, a concoction of sixty-odd ingredients, chief among them the pulverized flesh of a viper--that is to say, snake oil.
It acts exactly like the 'theriac' [sic!], an infallible remedy for all illnesses....
(103) The range of healing techniques mentioned by Barros includes the use of theriac, the all-purpose medicine known to have been prescribed from late antiquity onwards.
He also addresses Marcus Aurelius' use of an opium-containing theriac and tonic, mediated through his physician, Galen.