theomania

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the·o·ma·ni·a

(thē'ō-mā'nē-ă),
A delusion in which one believes oneself God.
[G. theos, god, + mania, frenzy]

theomania

(thē-ō-mā′nē-ă) [Gr. theos, god, + mania, madness]
Religious insanity; esp. that in which the patient thinks he or she is a deity or has divine inspiration.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Type A theology, whose prototype was Tertullian, is "countercultural," whereas Type B (Origen) is "synthetic," and Type C (Irenaeus) is "historical," with emphasis on recapitulation and salvation as theosis, or "divinization.
This avoids the heresy of becoming one with the essence of God, because, in Orthodoxy, the "likeness" is the theosis (glorification), which is salvation by grace--freely given to the hesychast by God.
This is what theosis means: to know God fully, with the heart and the mind, is to be taken into His being, to be made like Him by filling oneself with Him.
Simultaneously overlapping Orthodox "families" of spiritual fathers and spiritual children, engaged in the paths of ascetic theosis and coupled with more visible layers of families in monastic, parish, and ecclesiastical hierarchies, provide in conjunction with biological families a dynamic model of subsidiarity beyond technocratic definitions.
We all read with our own prejudices and blinders, and I admit readily I read this as someone who wants this moment of theosis to be simple and clear.
The Immaculate Conception in the Ecumenical Dialogue with Orthodoxy: How the Term Theosis Can Inform Convergence:' Marian Studies 55 (2004): 212-44.
Mannermaa's Finnish school argues that the best answer is an ontological one, that Luther endorses something like the Orthodox doctrine of theosis, whereby the believer participates in the Divine nature by exemplifying some of its attributes, especially moral attributes like love (see Braaten & Jensen, 1998).
Their topics include deification in Jesus' teaching, Clement of Alexandria on trinitarian and metaphysical relationality in the context of deification, Basil of Caesarea and the Cappadocians on the distinction between essence and energies in God and its relevance to the deification theme, between creation and salvation, and the appropriation of theosis by contemporary Baptist theologians.
At the same time, the fact that theosis to Cusanus is a theological doctrine of a distinctively Christian stamp signifies for Hudson that his philosophical results will likely also carry Christological overtones, whether this has to do with God's relationship to the world or the way humanity relates to either.
Theosis and sanctification: John Wesley's reformulation of a patristic doctrine.
Becoming God: The Doctrine of Theosis in Nicholas Cusa.