theomania

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the·o·ma·ni·a

(thē'ō-mā'nē-ă),
A delusion in which one believes oneself God.
[G. theos, god, + mania, frenzy]

theomania

(thē-ō-mā′nē-ă) [Gr. theos, god, + mania, madness]
Religious insanity; esp. that in which the patient thinks he or she is a deity or has divine inspiration.
References in periodicals archive ?
(51) Often the impression is given that theosis is understood rather personally or statically the disciple is transformed, but not discipleship as such.
Their foundational work on ideas like Incarnation and theosis would become authoritative doctrine in the Eastern Church.
(10.) Esta via negativa de ejercicio interior abierta por Platon hacia la deificacion del hombre (theosis) es la base de lo que Maria Toscano ha denominado la "mistica especulativa del ser" que llega a misticos como Juan de la Cruz.
Theosis, Sino-Christian Theology, and the Second Chinese Enlightenment: Heaven and Humanity in Unity.
Philosophy was a way of life that involved spiritual exercises, made famous in modern scholarship by the late Pierre Hadot and especially the practice of theurgy (conjuring up the gods in religious ritual as a means to achievement understanding)--the goal of which was theosis, to become god-like as Plato had announced centuries before.
He began writing the Commedia, his epic account of an imaginative journey from darkness to the ultimate light: theosis, or unity with God.
like falling in love with God." Pinnock describes salvation as union with God, beatific vision, communion, and theosis, not just as acquittal in a courtroom.
(8) This experiential tradition is not determined by philosophical reasoning, academic discussion, or in political discourse and does not include a static sense of an ethical following of natural law in creation but focuses on personal theosis or a dynamic relationship with the uncreated energies of God.
Maximus the Confessor," Andrew Louth explains the concept of deification or theosis. Put simply, theosis is the process of a person participating so deeply in God that he or she unites with God.
Thus, for example, notions that testify to the Christocentric character of Russian thought--kenosis (God's self-sacrifice for man's sake) and theosis (the idea that man is not only created in the likeness of God but is also bound to become His likeness)--often emerge in the pages of this volume.
As Zimmerman's narrative well demonstrates, the new aim of theosis (achieving godlikeness in Christ) animates, like the current through a running stream, the progress of the West's cultural advance: "The theological origins of humanism planted in Western consciousness a profound sense of human dignity, solidarity, freedom, and social responsibility" (113).
Kahn does not make this explicit, but the culmination of the argument that links knowledge by presence with God's knowledge of things is a deliberate instrumentalization of Mulla Sadra's very approach to philosophy as a way of life; since philosophy is a rehearsal of what it means to be like God (the notion of theosis or ta'alluh in Arabic), then ultimately perfected human knowledge needs to imitate divine knowledge.