sexual selection

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sex·u·al se·lec·tion

a form of natural selection in which, according to darwinian theory, the male or female is attracted by certain characteristics, form, color, behavior, etc., in the opposite sex; thus modifications of a special nature are brought about in the species.

sexual selection

n. Biology
The process in nature by which individuals with certain traits, especially secondary sex characteristics such as colorful plumage and large antlers, are chosen more often for mating and thus pass those traits on to their offspring.

sex·u·al se·lec·tion

(sek'shū-ăl sĕ-lek'shŭn)
A form of natural selection in which, according to Darwin's theory, the male or female is attracted by certain characteristics, forms, colors, behaviors, and phenomena, in the opposite sex; thus, modifications of a special nature are brought about in the species.

sexual selection

the selection of a mate by female animals where, for example, the most brightly coloured is favoured, so maintaining brightly coloured males in a population. Some authorities consider that sexual selection explains the existence of SECONDARY SEXUAL CHARACTERS.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The subsidiary theory of Sexual Selection clarifies the mechanism that permits Natural Selection.
Four years later One of Ours would make a very different political use of Darwin's theory of sexual selection. Published twenty-five months after the Nineteenth Amendment had passed, this novel appeared at a time when women no longer needed to worry about attenuating male fears.
Part III explains the theory of sexual selection, which accounts for the striking dimorphisms in coloration, feathers, weaponry, and ornamentation among nonhuman animals.
Darwin uses his own theory of sexual selection, with its emphasis on energy and perseverance, to try to turn Mill's argument back on itself and to confirm the superiority of man.
In 1871 he proposed his theory of Sexual Selection operating at two levels (1) same sex competition and (2) mate choice.
Judson's clever format makes it a delight to learn more about Darwin's theory of sexual selection, and her 'answers' divulge an impressive knowledge of natural history and evolutionary biology.
The Darwin Blackwell chides is one whose theory of sexual selection "supposes that a male superiority has been evolved in the male line.
Between this stimulating definition and the book's postscriptive claims--that Darwin's theory of sexual selection and Ellis's psychology of sex both replicate in their plottings the fictions of female modesty--the close analyses of the novels which form the centre of its argument illuminate just how '[woman's] energy .
According to Derry, such evenings contributed to Darwin's theory of sexual selection.

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