sexual selection

(redirected from Theory of sexual selection)
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sex·u·al se·lec·tion

a form of natural selection in which, according to darwinian theory, the male or female is attracted by certain characteristics, form, color, behavior, etc., in the opposite sex; thus modifications of a special nature are brought about in the species.

sexual selection

n. Biology
The process in nature by which individuals with certain traits, especially secondary sex characteristics such as colorful plumage and large antlers, are chosen more often for mating and thus pass those traits on to their offspring.

sexual selection

the selection of mates on the basis of the attraction of or preference for certain traits, such as coloration or behavior patterns, so that eventually only those particular traits appear in succeeding generations. It explains the wide variety of sexual characteristics among the various species.

sex·u·al se·lec·tion

(sek'shū-ăl sĕ-lek'shŭn)
A form of natural selection in which, according to Darwin's theory, the male or female is attracted by certain characteristics, forms, colors, behaviors, and phenomena, in the opposite sex; thus, modifications of a special nature are brought about in the species.

sexual selection

the selection of a mate by female animals where, for example, the most brightly coloured is favoured, so maintaining brightly coloured males in a population. Some authorities consider that sexual selection explains the existence of SECONDARY SEXUAL CHARACTERS.
References in periodicals archive ?
You take a different approach to Darwinism and specifically to his theory of sexual selection, which you have challenged.
Part III explains the theory of sexual selection, which accounts for the striking dimorphisms in coloration, feathers, weaponry, and ornamentation among nonhuman animals.
Darwin uses his own theory of sexual selection, with its emphasis on energy and perseverance, to try to turn Mill's argument back on itself and to confirm the superiority of man.
In 1871 he proposed his theory of Sexual Selection operating at two levels (1) same sex competition and (2) mate choice.
According to Derry, such evenings contributed to Darwin's theory of sexual selection.
Of greater concern, Roughgarden undercuts her scientific credibility with her strident opposition to Darwin's theory of sexual selection.

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