sexual selection

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sex·u·al se·lec·tion

a form of natural selection in which, according to darwinian theory, the male or female is attracted by certain characteristics, form, color, behavior, etc., in the opposite sex; thus modifications of a special nature are brought about in the species.

sexual selection

n. Biology
The process in nature by which individuals with certain traits, especially secondary sex characteristics such as colorful plumage and large antlers, are chosen more often for mating and thus pass those traits on to their offspring.

sexual selection

the selection of mates on the basis of the attraction of or preference for certain traits, such as coloration or behavior patterns, so that eventually only those particular traits appear in succeeding generations. It explains the wide variety of sexual characteristics among the various species.

sex·u·al se·lec·tion

(sek'shū-ăl sĕ-lek'shŭn)
A form of natural selection in which, according to Darwin's theory, the male or female is attracted by certain characteristics, forms, colors, behaviors, and phenomena, in the opposite sex; thus, modifications of a special nature are brought about in the species.

sexual selection

the selection of a mate by female animals where, for example, the most brightly coloured is favoured, so maintaining brightly coloured males in a population. Some authorities consider that sexual selection explains the existence of SECONDARY SEXUAL CHARACTERS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Taken together, My Antonia and One of Ours thus reveal a commitment to translating Darwin's theory of sexual selection into a project of social change.
Summarizing the treatment of Darwin's theory of sexual selection in the hundred years after it was first articulated, Cronin writes: "Throughout most of this period, sexual selection remained on the Darwinian sidelines, neglected, distorted or misunderstood.
See Paul, supra note 109, at 878 ("[S]ince the 1970s, the theory of sexual selection and mate choice has experienced a fulminant revival, with major new theoretical insights and empirical findings.
Even Bert Bender's study The Descent of Love, which revises the conventional classifications of realism and naturalism by identifying the centrality of the theory of sexual selection, asserts that the view of sexual love in American novels between 1871 and 1926 became increasingly "violent and dark" (xi).
The Descent of Love: Darwin and the Theory of Sexual Selection in American Fiction, 1871-1926.
Of greater concern, Roughgarden undercuts her scientific credibility with her strident opposition to Darwin's theory of sexual selection.
IMPLICATIONS FOR THE GENERAL THEORY OF SEXUAL SELECTION
In the theory of sexual selection traits seen as desirable but which give no competitive advantage to a species are passed down through generations.
Darwin (1871) introduced the theory of sexual selection to explain an unusual class of traits that he called secondary sexual characters.
When introducing his theory of sexual selection, Darwin (1859) envisaged two distinct mechanisms.
Darwin's theory of sexual selection and the data subsumed by it, in the light of recent research.

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