recapitulation theory

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Related to Theory of recapitulation: Ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny

recapitulation theory

 
ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny, i.e., an organism, in the course of its development, goes through the same successive stages (in abbreviated form) as did the species in its evolutionary development.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

re·ca·pit·u·la·tion the·o·ry

the theory formulated by E.H. Haeckel that people during their embryonic development pass through stages similar in general structural plan to the stages their species passed through in its evolution; more technically phrased, the theory that ontogeny is an abbreviated recapitulation of phylogeny.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

recapitulation theory

The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

re·ca·pit·u·la·tion the·o·ry

(rē'kă-pich'yū-lā'shŭn thē'ŏr-ē)
That individuals in their embryonic development pass through stages similar in general structural plan to the stages their species passed through in its evolution; more technically phrased, the theory that ontogeny is an abbreviated recapitulation of phylogeny.
Synonym(s): Haeckel law.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Haeckel,

Ernst, German naturalist, 1834-1919.
Haeckel gastrea theory - that the two-layered gastrula is the ancestral form of all multicellular animals. Synonym(s): gastrea theory
Haeckel law - the theory that ontogeny is an abbreviated recapitulation of phylogeny. Synonym(s): recapitulation theory
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The most detrimental of these explanations was the theory of recapitulation, which posited that ontogeny, or the organism, recapitulated phylogeny, or the species.
It is now clear, at least, that colonial anthropology and the theory of recapitulation could be extremely dangerous weapons if used with nefarious intent (Gould 1977; Traverso 2001).
But many leading intellectuals of his day, including those cited above, were deeply influenced by the theory of recapitulation. And Hall, Stephen Jay Gould reminds us was "not a crackpot, but America's premier psychologist" (Gould 1981, 147).

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