cognitive dissonance

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dissonance

 [dis´o-nans]
discord or disagreement.
cognitive dissonance anxiety or similar unpleasant feelings resulting from a lack of agreement between a person's established ideas, beliefs, and attitudes and some more recently acquired information or experience.

cog·ni·tive dis·so·nance the·o·ry

a theory of attitude formation and behavior describing a motivational state that exists when a person's cognitive elements (attitudes, perceived behaviors, etc.) are inconsistent with each other (dissonance), such as the espousal of the Ten Commandments concurrent with the belief that it is all right to cheat on one's taxes, and indicating that people try to achieve consistency (consonance) by changing attitudes, rationalizing, selective perception, and other means.
See also: balance theory, consistency principle.

cognitive dissonance

n. Psychology
The psychological tension that occurs when one holds mutually exclusive beliefs or attitudes and that often motivates people to modify their thoughts or behaviors in order to reduce the tension.

cognitive dissonance

Etymology: L, cognoscere, to know, dis, opposite of, sonare, to sound
a state of tension resulting from a discrepancy in a person's emotional and intellectual frame of reference for interpreting and coping with his or her environment. It usually occurs when new information contradicts existing assumptions or knowledge.

cog·ni·tive dis·so·nance

(kog'ni-tiv dis'ŏ-năns)
A motivational state that exists when a person's attitudes, perceptions, and related cognitive state are inconsistent with each other, e.g., hating African Americans as a group but admiring Martin Luther King, Jr.

cognitive dissonance

A psychological term meaning conflict resulting from inconsistency between beliefs and actions, as of a person professing an ethical code but cheating at the Customs.
References in periodicals archive ?
The experiments conducted in this study, in contrast, expanded upon research by Kachelmeier and Messier (1990) using an aid using subjective inputs and allowing users to direct the decision aid recommendation and found evidence that user direction of decision aids can be explained using the theory of cognitive dissonance, and that decision aid guidance partially offsets direction of decision aids.
39) The theory of cognitive dissonance was first introduced by psychologist Leon Festinger (1919-1989) in his 1957 publication A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance.
The theory of cognitive dissonance seems to provide a promising model that can explain the effects of rational and moral justification of consumers when purchasing counterfeit products.
Contradiction--it may be supposed that at least one of the two starting points is wrong, and this may lead to forgetting or deletion as mentioned before; the theory of cognitive dissonance should be considered, too.
Self-justification theory draws on both Festinger's (1957) theory of cognitive dissonance and Kiesler's (1971) theory of psychological commitment to explain the motivation underlying managers' escalation of commitment.
According to Leon Festinger's A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance, the classic cognitive dissonance theory explanation for this is that ".
Recent research in the areas of mass media persuasion, diffusion of ideas through social groups, and especially the studies growing out of the development of the theory of cognitive dissonance have demonstrated the fallacy of the premises inherent in the traditional studies of advertising believability.
One way of understanding the group psychology of those movements in which the end of the world is predicted by a messiah figure and which yet manage to continue after the date given for the apocalypse has passed, is via the theory of cognitive dissonance.
One of the most influential cognitive consistency theories has been the theory of cognitive dissonance.
It took the emergence of Leon Festinger's more u nified theory of cognitive dissonance both to explain and predict the nature of persuasive communication in terms of motivation, not cognition.
The social-psychological theory of cognitive dissonance maintains that individuals feel pressure to produce consistent relations among their attitudes and behaviors and to avoid inconsistency (Festinger, 1957).

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