Theory of Goal Attainment

Theory of Goal Attainment

A middle-range nursing theory developed by Imogene King that helps to identify the nature of nurse-client interactions leading to goal attainment. This theory concentrates on working with clients to attain, maintain, and restore health through communication, goal setting, and goal achievement. general systems framework;
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References in periodicals archive ?
King first published her conceptual framework in 1971 and further developed it into the theory of goal attainment in 1981 (Johson and Webber 2001).
King (1981) introduced a theory of goal attainment, a middle-range theory derived from the conceptual system.
Although there have been few changes to the conceptual system or theory of goal attainment since 1981, King and others have provided ongoing discussion and clarification of these theoretical and philosophical positions through debates in nursing journals and presentations (King 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2000; Norris and Frey 2001).
APPLICATION OF THEORY OF GOAL ATTAINMENT TO CURRENT STUDY
The theoretical framework for its development was built upon Maslow's hierarchy of needs and Imogene King's theory of goal attainment. It is also based on the cycle of learning model developed by Sackett and colleagues to assist nurse educators and their students apply the concepts inherent within evidence-based practice (23,24).
In essence, King's theory of goal attainment builds on the Maslow hierarchy, applying it to nursing by intertwining personal, interpersonal, and social systems theory within a framework that emphasizes learning, theory development, and enhanced self esteem of the learner (26).
King's theory of goal attainment as a framework for managed care implementation in a hospital setting, Nursing Science Quarterly, 7(4), 170-173.
King's theory of goal attainment, Nursing Science Quarterly, 5, 19-26.
The three systems that constitute King's conceptual framework provided the basis for the development of her Theory of Goal Attainment.
The relationships between these three systems led to King's Theory of Goal Attainment.
King (1981) stated, "Although personal systems and social systems influence quality of care, the major elements in a theory of goal attainment are discovered in the interpersonal systems in which two people, who are usually strangers, come together in a health care organization to help and to be helped to maintain a state of health that permits functioning in roles" (p.
After careful analysis of King's Conceptual Framework and Theory of Goal Attainment, it is evident that this model can be implemented in an emergency room setting.