communication theory

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communication theory

a hypothesis that describes a model for information transfer consisting of a source of information (the sender), a transmitter, a communication channel, a source of noise (interference), a receiver, and a purpose for the message.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are, I will argue, four theories of communication, although this number is somewhat arbitrary.
This is certainly the impression left by Western theories of communication.
What I have sought to do in this article is to call attention to the importance of understanding and drawing on the Buddhist approach to personhood, agency and communication as a way of investigating into the deficiencies of the existing models and theories of communication in the Western world.
However, this operation was then no longer theoretically reflected in terms of available theories of communication.
In six chapters, Ellis first discusses the construction of communication theory, then narrows his focus to address "medium theory"--a terrain he finds littered with the carcasses of "a great many models and theories of communication .
Even when they developed seemingly comprehensive abstract theories of communication, they are still prodded to enrich them by engaging in theorizing about concrete cultural particularities in greater depth and detail (see Starosta, 2006).
Because they do not theorize from Asian, and other non-Western, cultural and communicative particularities, existing Eurocentric theories of communication neither accurately reflect nor fully respond to discourse about communication realities in Asia and other parts of the non-Western world.
present nine papers that apply contemporary theories of communication and media to the problem of countering ideologically sanctioned terrorism.
of Southern Denmark) describe the waves and their goals, feminist theories of communication such as structuralism, muted group, standpoint, poststructuralism, performance and cyborg, methodologies such as conversation analysis and transversal discourse analysis, sexist and situated dominance, and the discourses of difference and identity.
Of course, the main reason I do not quote more fully here is that I hope Chinese scholars can read the book Asiacentric Theories of Communication, and more directly communicate with the various authors' thoughts found therein.