Thelazia

(redirected from Thelazia gulosa)

Thelazia

(thē-lā'zē-ă),
The eye worms, a genus of spiruroid nematodes that inhabit the lacrimal ducts and surface of the eyes of various domestic and wild animals, but rarely humans; a number of species have been reported from wild birds. Cyclic development occurs in muscoid flies; infective larvae emerge from the fly mouthparts while the fly is feeding on or near the eyes of the host.
[G. thēlazō, to suck]

Thelazia

(thē-lā′zē-ă) [Gr. thelazo, to suck]
A genus of nematodes that inhabit the conjunctival sac and lacrimal ducts of various species of vertebrates. Occasionally species of Thelazia are found in humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
A: You're correct -- a 26-year-old woman from Oregon discovered that she was infected with Thelazia gulosa, a parasite commonly known as the cattle eye worm.
"Cases of eye worm parasitic infections are rare in the USA, and this case turned out to be a species of the Thelazia that had never been reported in humans," Bradbury said, adding that previously it was thought there were only two different species of these eye worms that infected humans worldwide, and now Thelazia gulosa is the third.
The parasitic worms - known as the Thelazia gulosa species - are less than half an inch long each and until now have spread solely among cattle by flies that feed on eyeball lubrication.
This undated photo provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows Thelazia gulosa, a type of eye worm seen in cattle in the northern United States and southern Canada, but never before in humans.
Keywords: Cattle; Thelazia gulosa; Thelazia rhodesii