gaze

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gaze

 [gāz]
1. to look in one direction for a period of time.
2. the act or state of looking steadily in one direction.

gaze

(gāz),
The act of looking steadily at an object.

gaze

(gāz)
1. to look steadily in one direction.
2. the act of looking steadily at something.

conjugate gaze  the normal movement of the two eyes simultaneously in the same direction to bring something into view.

gaze

[gāz]
Etymology: ME, gazen, to stare
a state of looking in one direction. A person with normal vision has six basic positions of gaze, each determined by control of different combinations of contractions of extraocular muscles. See also cardinal position of gaze.

gaze

To fixate steadily or continuously. See cardinal positions of gaze.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the case of recorded texts such as photographs and films (as opposed to those involving interpersonal communication such as video-conferences), a key feature of the gaze is that the object of the gaze is not aware of the current viewer (though they may originally have been aware of being filmed, photographed, painted etc.
The gaze interaction elements smoothly integrate into the flow of the game.
Issues concerning the gaze are taken up again, however, in photographs wherein Brotherus looks neither at a landscape nor toward her camera but directly at another figure in a studio.
Contained within the stereotyping process is the structuring of implicit power relations where the gaze is of the dominant, looking at the subordinate" (4).
Philip Armstrong's Shakespeare's Visual Regime: Tragedy, Psychoanalysis and the Gaze is a provocative, largely Lacanian, account of the visual and subjective dispensation inaugurated, he argues, during the early modern era and articulated with particular knowingness in Shakespearean drama.
forced to take the roles of spectators in a drama whose main action--that of watching and being watched--is divided between a male and a female protagonist, and where the gender-specific attribution of the roles of subject and object of the gaze is staged as invariable.
Electrodes implanted in the animals' supplementary eye fields identified a group of cells that became more active only after monkeys failed to stop the gaze shift and another that reacted solely to successful cancellations, the scientists report in the Dec.
Cultural construction theory suggests that this gender imaging is not unidirectional, but must work in both directions -- so that the gazer is him/herself as much influenced by the act of the gaze as is the subject of the gaze (see: Belsey, 1980).
Maurice Merleau-Ponty, writing of the ideological force of the gaze in The Visible and the Invisible, argues that "we could not dream of seeing [things] 'all naked' because the gaze itself envelops them [and] clothes them with its own flesh" (1968, 131).
Castiglione's elegy, which represents his wife speaking on the subject of the Raphael portrait of him, may be at once a hyper self-conscious Petrarchan performance on Castiglione's part (in which the gaze of his represented self in Raphael's painting is met by the gaze of his represented wife and son in his poem), a sincere effort to commemorate a mutual love between Castiglione and his family, and an intensely narcissistic love letter to himself.
In other words, when and how does the reader, who begins the text in a subject position, become the object of the gaze of the narrative?
4) Mulvey's topic was the controlling, organizing look of the camera, the gaze of desire taking pleasure in gazing.