fall

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fall

 [fawl]
a coming down freely, usually under the influence of gravity.
risk for f's a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as increased susceptibility to falling that may cause physical harm.

fall

Drug slang
verb A regional term meaning to get arrested (for drug-related crime).

Public health
noun A precipitous drop from a height, or from a higher to a lower position, which is often accompanied by injuries.
 
Epidemiology
30% of those > 65 years old fall/year; 10–15% suffer injuries, such as fractures of the hip (1%) and other sites (5%), and soft tissue injuries (5%); it is the 6th-leading cause of death in the elderly.
 
Risk factors
Postural hypotension; use of sedatives; use of 4+ prescription medicines; impaired arm or leg movement, strength, balance or gait; fall survivors suffer from functional decline in activities of daily living and a increased risk of institutionalisation.

Management
Fall risk in the elderly can be decreased with exercise and endurance, flexibility, dynamic balance and resistance training, behaviour modification, and adjustment of medications.

fall

Public health A precipitous drop from a height, or from a higher position, which may be accompanied by injuries Epidemiology 30% of those > 65 yrs old fall/yr; 10-15% suffer injuries–eg, hip Fx–1% and other sites–5%, and soft tissue injuries–5%; it is the 6th leading cause of death in the elderly Risk factors Postural hypotension, use of sedatives, use of 4+ prescription medicines, impaired arm or leg movement, strength, balance, or gait; fall survivors suffer from functional decline in ADL and a ↑ risk of institutionalization; fall risk in the elderly can be ↓ with exercise and endurance, flexibility, dynamic balance, and resistance training, behavior modification, adjustment of medications
References in periodicals archive ?
Initially, the devils retain the ability to choose any shape to "execute thir eerie purposes" (PL I, 423-31), in contrast with their condition after the fall of man when they are imprisoned in forms symbolic of their sin.
So entrenched in the ecclesiastical psyche is this misogynistic prejudice that even 2,000 years after the birth of Christ it is still deemed necessary for Welsh bishops, in April 2008, to debate whether the authors of the fall of man and the instigators of original sin have redeemed themselves sufficiently in the eyes of the church to be allowed entry into the exalted realms of bishop authority and the higher echelons of spiritual status.
Having produced 2003 a reference to men and women in the Bible, Tischler (emerita, English and humanities, Pennsylvania State U.) here describes groups of people such as professions or nationalities, commonly referenced cultures and places such as Egypt and Galilee, theological constructs such as the Fall of Man and the Resurrection, events and activities, pagan gods, and other matters of possible interest to lay readers of the Hebrew or Christian Bible.
The cycle covers the story of the Fall of Man and his redemption, from the creation of the angels to the Final Judgment.
the fall of man, the whole fabric indeed of superstition which it supports, can no longer obtain the credit of philosophers.'