crab louse

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crab louse

n.
A parasitic louse (Phthirus pubis) that infests the pubic region and causes severe itching. Also called pubic louse.

crab louse

Etymology: AS, crabba + lus
a species of louse, Phthirus pubis, that infests the hairs of the genital area. It is often transmitted between persons by sexual contact but can also be spread by shared bedding. Pubic lice are usually easily killed with 1% permethrin or pyrethrin shampoo. Also called crabs. Formerly called Pediculus pubis. See also lice, pediculosis.
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Crab louse

crab louse

Phthirus inguinalis and Phthirus pubis; the louse that infests the pubic region and other hairy areas of the body. See: pediculosis
See also: louse

crab louse

The human ectoparasite Pediculus pubis (Phthirus pubis ), which is usually confined to the genital area, especially in the pubic hair, and is transmitted during sexual intercourse.
References in periodicals archive ?
Generally, the crab is a brownish-green color, but can appear a darker brown or a deep, almost-purple black, as well.
Because the same crabs were used for both experiments, the 2-clawed treatment of each experiment was conducted first (diet choice experiment 2, then prey size selection, as described later), and then the larger, crusher claw was removed from the crabs to conduct the 1-clawed treatment of each experiment (diet choice experiment 2, then prey size selection).
Nonetheless, representatives of the town's $3 million shellfish industry say the crabs need to be protected in their natural habitat because they are valuable for aerating the soil and eating shellfish predators such as worms.
Given the length of time the crabs were likely in the pots, it is unlikely that many of these crabs would have escaped alive (High and Worlund, 1979).
Other specials include a Crab "Un" Cake, which features 84% crab and just enough filler to hold the crab together without compromising flavor and texture.
Seventy-five percent of the crab is caught in the first eight weeks of the season, meaning winter.
They typically form a conga line, smallest to largest, each holding onto the crab in front of it, and, once a hapless crab is wrenched from its shell, simultaneously move into larger shells.
All but one of the crabs survived and are now in a quarantine unit at the National Sea Life Centre.
How might the crabs and fish that are moving up from the south disturb the food web in the northern Bering Sea?
The crabs don't have eyes so it's also possible that the hairs work as sensors.
The crabs spend their adult life in freshwater but spawn at sea and can also cross dry land.
The crabs have become so popular that the Hermit Crab Association - its first crab convention was held in 2000 in a Virginia home and drew 10 people - now boasts more than 1,000 members.