crab louse

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crab louse

n.
A parasitic louse (Phthirus pubis) that infests the pubic region and causes severe itching. Also called pubic louse.

crab louse

Etymology: AS, crabba + lus
a species of louse, Phthirus pubis, that infests the hairs of the genital area. It is often transmitted between persons by sexual contact but can also be spread by shared bedding. Pubic lice are usually easily killed with 1% permethrin or pyrethrin shampoo. Also called crabs. Formerly called Pediculus pubis. See also lice, pediculosis.
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Crab louse

crab louse

Phthirus inguinalis and Phthirus pubis; the louse that infests the pubic region and other hairy areas of the body. See: pediculosis
See also: louse

crab louse

The human ectoparasite Pediculus pubis (Phthirus pubis ), which is usually confined to the genital area, especially in the pubic hair, and is transmitted during sexual intercourse.
References in periodicals archive ?
The crab then approached the bird, grabbing and breaking its other wing.
For the study of octolasmid infestation on the crabs, a total of 2725 specimens of the two species of Portunus, collected during January 2004 to December 2005, were examined.
The crabs were even stronger than scientists expected.
The results of raising crabs with different pH values of water showed that no death and no symptoms of HPND in crabs were found in the crabs raised in the water of pH 8.
Here, the impact of claw loss, by two methods of claw removal, is examined during competition between males for access to females in the crab Cancer pagurus.
Some retail stores and restaurants have salt water-filled tanks that can keep the crab alive for days, but most don't.
Australia identifies the crab as one of the top 30 invasive species of concern.
The crabs are put into plastic mesh bait bags that are attached to the conch pots by bungee cords.
Divers returned 24 hours later to observe where the crabs were positioned in the boxes and recorded EMF values.
Given the length of time the crabs were likely in the pots, it is unlikely that many of these crabs would have escaped alive (High and Worlund, 1979).
Then the crabs were placed on an underwater treadmill encased in a clear acrylic plastic chamber (1301) and powered by an external DC motor with a speed control.
Seventy-five percent of the crab is caught in the first eight weeks of the season, meaning winter.