Turing test

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Turing test

A test of artificial intelligence devised by UK mathematician, Alan Turing, who predicted in 1950 that by 2000, a computer could be programmed so that after 5 minutes of questioning, the average interrogator would not have more than a 70% chance of telling whether he or she was talking to a machine or a human. The state of AI has advanced to the degree that for the 2010 Loebner Prize—a platform for Turing Tests—the interaction time was increased to 25 minutes.
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As Humphrys (2009: 252) argues '[f]or anyone who takes the Turing Test seriously, passing the "orgasm" Turing Test (i.
Like Audrey--Lentz's wife who has been mentally debilitated by a spell of anoxia--Peter is a member of the human species whose life has value that cannot be reduced to what the Turing test inherently identifies as central to being human, that which can be measured by information patterns, intelligent and rational "output.
Maybe the only interesting confirmation of the TT was that no program has ever passed the Turing Test and that the media reports about such an event in 2014 were not well founded: "The 65-year-old iconic Turing Test was passed for the very first time by the computer programme Eugene Goostman during a Turing Test in 2014, held at the renowned Royal Society in London on Saturday.
Upon arriving, Caleb learns that the real purpose of his visit is to administer the Turing test to Nathan's latest creation, Ava.
The Turing test features prominently in Alex Garland's new film Ex Machina, but this is no meditation on computer science.
Turing Test Beaten--Chat bot convinces human panel it is human, July, 2014: In a 1950 paper, Alan Turing developed the Turing Test to create a standard method to tell if a machine could be considered intelligent.
Recently, a software program was able to pass the Turing test and convinced over half a panel of judges that it was a teenage boy.
If the programmer in the Turing Test must produce a recognizable human, the example of the Tainobot reveals that part of what must be recognizable, particularly in visualized chatbots, is a racial identity (on the Turing Test see Turing; Saygin, Cicekli, Akman).
It was after he read Brian Christian's book The Most Human Human--about the Turing test, an exercise in which the same question is posed to a human and a computer, and a third party decides which answer came from the machine--that Harrison took a stab at writing a two-hander between himself and a computer chat program, though he quickly learned technology isn't quite that sophisticated.
The Turing Test was held at the world famous Royal Society in London and is considered the most comprehensively designed tests ever.
I was reminded of all this by the recent nonsense about a computer passing the Turing test.
This is not easily identifiable to judges in the short 5-minute sessions of the Turing Test.