sense

(redirected from The Senses)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to The Senses: The five senses, The 5 senses, Human senses

sense

 [sens]
1. a faculty by which the conditions or properties of things are perceived. Five major senses were traditionally considered: vision, hearing, smell, taste, and touch. In addition, equilibrium, hunger, thirst, malaise, pain, and other types of senses have been distinguished. The operation of all senses involves the reception of stimuli by sense organs, each of which is sensitive to a particular kind of stimulus. The eyes are sensitive to light; the ears, to sound; the olfactory organs, to odor; and the taste buds, to taste. Various sense organs of the skin and other tissues are sensitive to touch, pain, temperature, and other sensations. On receiving stimuli, the sense organ translates them into nerve impulses that are transmitted along the sensory nerves to the brain. In the cerebral cortex, the impulses are interpreted, or perceived, as sensations. The brain associates them with other information, acts upon them, and stores them as memory. See also nervous system and brain.
2. pertaining to the sense strand of a nucleic acid.
sense of equilibrium the sense of maintenance of or divergence from an upright position, controlled by receptors in the vestibule of the ear.
kinesthetic sense muscle sense.
light sense the faculty by which degrees of brilliancy are distinguished.
muscle sense (muscular sense) the faculty by which muscular movements are perceived.
pain sense nociception.
position sense (posture sense) a variety of muscular sense by which the position or attitude of the body or its parts is perceived.
pressure sense the faculty by which pressure upon the surface of the body is perceived.
sixth sense the general feeling of consciousness of the entire body; cenesthesia.
somatic s's senses other than the special senses; these include touch, kinesthesia, nociception, pressure sense, temperature sense, and muscle sense, among others.
space sense the faculty by which relative positions and relations of objects in space are perceived.
special s's the senses of vision, hearing, taste, and smell; equilibrium is sometimes considered a special sense, but touch usually is not. See also somatic senses.
stereognostic sense the sense by which form and solidity are perceived.
temperature sense the ability to recognize differences in temperature; called also thermesthesia.

sense

(sens),
The faculty of perceiving any stimulus.
[L. sentio, pp. sensus, to feel, to perceive]

sense

(sens)
1. any of the physical processes by which stimuli are received, transduced, and conducted as impulses to be interpreted to the brain.
2. in molecular genetics, referring to the strand of a nucleic acid that directly specifies the product.

body sense  somatognosis.
color sense  the faculty by which colors are perceived and distinguished.
sense of equilibrium  the sense that maintains awareness of being or not being in an upright position, controlled by receptors in the vestibule of the ear.
joint sense  arthresthesia.
kinesthetic sense 
light sense  the sense by which degrees of brilliancy are distinguished.
motion sense , movement sense the awareness of motion by the head or body.
muscle sense , muscular sense
1. sensory impressions, such as movement and stretch, that come from the muscles.
pain sense  the ability to feel pain, caused by stimulation of a nociceptor.
position sense , posture sense the awareness of the position of the body or its parts in space, a combination of the sense of equilibrium and kinesthesia.
pressure sense  the sense by which pressure upon the surface of the body is perceived.
sixth sense  somatognosis.
somatic senses  senses other than the special senses, including touch, pressure, pain, and temperature, kinesthesia, muscle sense, visceral sense, and sometimes sense of equilibrium.
space sense  the sense by which relative positions and relations of objects in space are perceived.
special senses  those of seeing, hearing, taste, smell, and sometimes sense of equilibrium.
stereognostic sense  the sense by which form and solidity are perceived.
temperature sense  the sense by which differences of temperature are distinguished by the thermoreceptors.
vestibular sense  s. of equilibrium.
vibration sense  pallesthesia.
visceral sense  the awareness of sensations that arise from the viscera and stimulate the interoceptors; sensations include pain, pressure or fullness, and organ movement.

sense

(sĕns)
n.
a. Any of the faculties by which stimuli from outside or inside the body are received and felt, as the faculties of hearing, sight, smell, touch, taste, and equilibrium.
b. A perception or feeling produced by a stimulus; sensation: a sense of fatigue and hunger.
tr.v. sensed, sensing, senses
1. To become aware of; perceive: organisms able to sense their surroundings.
2. To detect automatically: sense radioactivity.
adj.
Genetics Of or relating to the portion of the strand of double-stranded DNA that serves as a template for and is transcribed into RNA.

sense

Etymology: L, sentire, to feel
1 n, the faculty by which stimuli are perceived and conditions outside and within the body are distinguished and evaluated. The major senses are sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch, and pressure. Other senses include hunger; thirst; pain; temperature; proprioception; and spatial, temporal, and visceral sensations.
2 n, the ability to feel; a sensation.
3 n, the capacity to understand; normal mental ability.
4 v, to perceive through a sense organ.
5 adj, pertaining to the sense strand of a nucleic acid. Compare antisense.

Sense

The National Deafblind and Rubella Association. The leading national (UK) charity that supports and campaigns for children and adults who are deafblind, providing expert advice and information as well as specialist services to deafblind people, their families, carers and the professionals who work with them. Sense also supports people with sensory impairments and additional disabilities.

sense

Neurology The ability to perceive a stimulus. See Haptic sense.

sense

(sens)
The faculty of perceiving any stimulus.
[L. sentio, pp. sensus, to feel, to perceive]

sense

stimulus perception
  • pressure sense discrimination of varying levels of pressure at the body surface

  • special senses sight, smell, sound, taste, touch

sense 

Any faculty (or ability) by which some aspect of the environment is perceived. The five main senses are those of sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch. The sense of sight may be further divided into the colour sense, the form sense, the light sense, the space sense, etc.

sense

(sens)
Faculty of perceiving any stimulus.
[L. sentio, pp. sensus, to feel, to perceive]

sense (sens),

n a faculty by which the conditions or properties of things are perceived. Hunger, thirst, malaise, and pain are varieties of sense.
sense, special,
n one or all of the five senses: feeling, hearing, seeing, smell, and taste.

sense

a faculty by which the conditions or properties of things are perceived. Hunger, thirst, malaise and pain are varieties of sense; a sense of equilibrium or of well-being (euphoria) and other senses are also distinguished. The five major senses comprise vision, hearing, smell (2), taste and touch (1).
The operation of all senses involves the reception of stimuli by sense organs. Each sense organ is sensitive to a particular kind of stimulus. The eyes are sensitive to light; the ears, to sound; the olfactory organs of the nose, to odor; and the taste buds of the tongue, to taste. Various sense organs of the skin and other tissues are sensitive to touch, pain, temperature and other sensations.
On receiving stimuli, the sense organ translates them into nerve impulses that are transmitted along the sensory nerves to the brain. In the cerebral cortex, the impulses are interpreted, or perceived, as sensations. The brain associates them with other information, acts upon them, and stores them as memory. See also sensation.

cutaneous sense
skin senses including touch, pressure, pain, heat and cold.
sense organs
1. the organs of special sense including eye, olfactory organ, gustatory organs.
2. all organs containing sensory receptors.
special s's
the five senses including feeling, hearing, seeing, smelling, tasting.
sense strand

Patient discussion about sense

Q. I heard that patients are highly sensitive to their senses? what are the most common symptoms of fibromyalgia and can they be aggravated? I heard that patients are highly sensitive to their senses?

A. Great answeer...couldn't agree more!

Q. I am getting a sense of fear that I am getting addicted to alcohol. hi my friends……I am getting a sense of fear that I am getting addicted to alcohol; I am not sure of it as I drink casually in parties and I feel like having it again alone….I don’t always get the feel of satisfaction. Moreover if there is no party I keep a party and once with the party I drink again alone…it’s just making my head turn to alcohol after party. ..it has negative results in me as I have problem in getting my job done and I have lost huge money….please guide me…..I don’t want to go to doctor as I may lose my job if my office knows about it…

A. Though alcohol can be consumed in a social life, as the proverb says ‘too much of anything is good for nothing’ more than adequate consumption of alcohol will amount to health issue which is a concern for anyone. A will is an instrument to change the direction of the flow you desire. I guess these are thoughts you require now. May be you are towards alcoholism, but a diagnosis test in the form of questionnaire hints on the persons will to accept and leave the alcohol. You have shown will to accept that you may be an alcoholic but leaving is the part of treatment and must be guided. For that please make your will strong to leave or reduce the consumption of alcohol to have a happy life ?

Q. I have a very acute sense of smell. Most things that have a smell cause me to have Migraines every day. I have heard that a chiropractor is who I need to treat me for this problem. Anyone else here have this problem? What have you done and were you able to treat it?

A. I can't remember where I heard about the chiropractor's involvement but it is really unpleasant. I tend to make life unpleasant for others to, just not to have a migraine. Things like cooking popcorn, perfumes, trash and many other things will give me a migraine (not a headache) right away. It may be called Hyperosmia (abnormal sense of smell).

More discussions about sense
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, even the examples of the inclusion of the senses in textbooks and some monographs offered by Roeder tend to remain incidental to the main narrative, their presence and function to flesh and excite the writing rather than explore explicitly the roles of all the senses in any systematic way.
Naturally, advances in the writing of cultural history have affected how historians of the senses conceptualize, narrate, and explicate their projects.
My own interest in the history of the senses derives principally from my reading of now classic social history, especially work by Hobsbawm and E.
My larger point is to suggest that thanks in part to the investigative style of social history, histories of the senses promise to rescue us from an Enlightenment conceit with visuality that is not only pernicious in its silent effect on historical writing but also responsible for a sometimes misleading, partial, and distorted "view" of the past.
Schmidt explains the relevance of, for example, Lucien Febvre's section on "Smells, Tastes, and Sounds" in The Problem of Unbelief in the Sixteenth Century and notes Robert Mandrou's contribution "in detailing a history of hearing loss in his inventory of the senses in early modern France.
But Schmidt is surely right when he suggests that Corbin's work, while "richer and more nuanced" that the adumbrated framework offered by the early Annales school, seems to be a refinement of an a priori insight, not least because, as Corbin himself has written, "The attention paid to the regime of sensory values and to the hierarchy of the representations and uses of the senses within a culture owes something to the intuitions of Lucien Febvre, imprecise though he may have been.
The rise of the sense of humor, Professor Wickberg argues, answered the strangest and most pressing demand of modern "bureaucratic individualism": it made possible a self that was capable of not taking itself too seriously.
The 18th century's proliferation of intuitive faculties of judgment--the sense of morality, the sense of beauty, etc.
By the turn-of-the-century the sense of humor became the signature attribute of a self that was defined as passive, detached, and consumerist, Wickberg argues.
There's not so much evidence for all that, but Wickberg takes his idea and runs with it through several penetrating chapters on the growing importance of the sense of humor in 19th and 20th century American culture.
The rise of the sense of humor rendered the individual a passive consumer, rather than a producer, of humor.
In the 20th century, the 'cult of the sense of humor' found its way into all spheres from which it had been strictly prohibited in the Victorian period, which Wickberg says recognized distinct humorous and serious spheres.