La Barra

(redirected from The Rod)
A form of torture which consists of tying the victim’s wrists with the ankles while keeping the knees completely flexed. A rod is passed under the knees and in front of the elbows, and the victim is then suspended by raising the rod
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So the old woman had to strike again three times upon the ground with the rod, and the next morning the garden was there.
If I could only get the rod hidden," thought he, and began gently shifting it to get it alongside of him; "willowtrees don't throw out straight hickory shoots twelve feet long, with no leaves, worse luck.
Tree'd at last," thinks Tom, making no answer, and keeping as close as possible, but working away at the rod, which he takes to pieces.
Now the figure of the glorious woman held a rod in either hand, and the rod in her right hand was white and of ivory, and the rod in her left hand was black and of ebony.
Then she, the Inkosazana, pointed with the rod of ivory to the gates of ivory; but still they stood before her, not moving.
It was also evident that, by exertion of a very unusual degree of activity and courage, an entrance into the window, from the rod, might have been thus effected.
He had strong hopes of now recapturing the brute, as it could scarcely escape from the trap into which it had ventured, except by the rod, where it might be intercepted as it came down.
We soon found ourselves driving out to sea at the rate of not less, certainly, than fifty or sixty miles an hour, so that we came up with Cape Clear, at some forty miles to our North, before we had secured the rod, and had time to think what we were about.
This morning we had again some little trouble with the rod of the propeller, which must be entirely remodelled, for fear of serious accident - I mean the steel rod - not the vanes.
And Uggug most unwillingly held the rod, and dangled the fly over the water.
exclaimed Miss Scatcherd; "nothing can correct you of your slatternly habits: carry the rod away.
He knew very well that this was Napoleon, but Napoleon's presence could no more intimidate him than Rostov's, or a sergeant major's with the rods, would have done, for he had nothing that either the sergeant major or Napoleon could deprive him of.