phantasm

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phantom

 [fan´tom]
1. an image or impression not evoked by actual stimuli.
2. a model of the body or of a specific part thereof.
3. a device for simulating the in vivo effect of radiation on tissues.

phan·tasm

(fan'tazm),
The mental imagery produced by fantasy.
Synonym(s): phantom (1)
[G. phantasma, an appearance]

phantasm

/phan·tasm/ (fan´tazm) an impression or image not evoked by actual stimuli, and usually recognized as false by the observer.

phantasm

[fan′taz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, phantasma, vision
an illusory image, such as an optical illusion of something that does not exist. See also phantom vision.

phan·tasm

(fan'tazm)
The mental imagery produced by fantasy.
Synonym(s): phantom (1) .
[G. phantasma, an appearance]
References in periodicals archive ?
The dynamic between Veronica and her siblings is fun to watch and the film would be stronger if this were put into clearer focus instead of the phantasm.
a metaphysics freed from its original profundity as well as from a supreme being, but also one that can conceive of the phantasms in its play of surfaces without the aid of models" (347-48).
Determined judgments themselves occur because of the dialectical relation between the conversion to the phantasm and the horizon.
The conversion to the phantasm, which links the intellect's knowledge of the universal concept to the sensate phantasm, reaches its term in the judgment only because the intellect can affirm the converted phantasm as a finite reality over against its preapprehension of infinite Being.
Therefore it understands the universal directly through the intelligible species, and indirectly the singular represented by the phantasm.
Knowing the singular, then, is a secondary process by which the intellect, having come to an understanding of the common nature, reflects back on the phantasm that was the source of the intelligible species and in this indirect way has some understanding of the singular.
61) This type of experience, linguistically traceable to Proclus and the Christian Neoplatonism of Nicholas of Cusa, induces Bruno to reconsider the nature and functions of the phantasms of the imagination.
With a quizzical expression, Rethorst wanders among the phantasms, lost in wonder not, like Solor, at the multitude of their identical female forms, but at the prodigality of the imagination that mothered them.
I beg you, I supplicate you, as your poor [male or female] servant, that if this my body or soul be molested, or vexed by filthy spirits, or by whatever ailment of the Demon, and also by whatever natural ailment, I beg you my good Jesus, that there be exterminated from my body, all heat, all cold, all ardor, all pestilence, and all the virtue of the infernal adversaries, all the exercises of the Demon, all the incursions, all the phantasms of the enemy, all the traps, imaginations fabricated by Diabolical art, be destroyed, and uprooted, and removed, from this my body, and soul.
Indeed, the immaculately staged layouts possess a distinct artificiality--a strangeness--that's as uncanny as the phantasms themselves.
That preparation, though, requires comparisons and the arrangement of ordered and proportional series of objects sharing in a common "nature," while it is imagination that guides the seeing-with-respect-to, intellect alone can grasp distinctions, but it can err when it fails to pay attention to the phantasms that a properly trained imagination offers.
Perhaps the problem is that Beecroft's seething imagination has gradually expanded from the individual--for her everything begins with the idea of the self-portrait through a vicarious persona--to encompass the collective, and she now finds herself elaborating images that are deposited somewhere among the phantasms that nurture our dreams or nightmares.