green revolution

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green revolution

A generic term for a constellation of research, development and technology-transfer initiatives that increase agriculture yields around the world, linked to high-yield grains, expanded irrigation, modernised land management, hybrid seeds, synthetic fertilisers and pesticides.

green revolution

the process by which humans have exploited new hybrid varieties of food crops such as barley, rice, maize and wheat to meet their requirements. New varieties have been produced by crossing and selection and by GENETIC ENGINEERING. The green revolution has had particularly dramatic effects on developing countries. For example, wheat yields in Mexico have increased by about 300% since the introduction of a new dwarf variety in 1960. However, the attempts at plant improvements have not always been of benefit to the peasant farmer.
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The paper studies the intertemporal trend of land distribution with a view to checking the legitimacy of the thesis that land distribution deteriorated under the Green Revolution in Pakistan by examining the arguments given in support of this thesis.
As Devinder Sharma, a food policy analyst who has written about the Green Revolution's evil side, points out: " With the high chemical input- based technology that ultimately led to land gasping for breath, with the waterguzzling crops sucking groundwater aquifers dry, and with the failure of markets to rescue the farmers from a collapse of the farming systems, the tragedy is that the human cost is entirely being borne by farmers." The suicides of debt- burdened farmers is a graphic expression of this concern.
They unrealistically assume that the large farmers were the sole beneficiaries of the Green Revolution and that land lease and land purchases by large farmers were essential for deriving benefits from the new technology.
In this paper, first a conceptual framework is developed to show the effect of the Green Revolution phenomenon on different levels of agricultural markets, and then, through empirical tests, the behaviour of the prices of wheat and rice (coarse) in the Green Revolution period is compared with that in the earlier periods.
I would like to add that my discussion on those pages clearly shows that although small farmers were not the early adopters of the Green Revolution technologies, they had almost caught up with the large farmers by the early Seventies.
Geopolitics was the biggest impetus for the Green Revolution. The US and the Soviet Union were locked in the Cold War.
Bourne also profiles the forgotten hero of the Green Revolution, scientist Norman Borlaug, who developed many of the seeds and techniques that fueled the agricultural revolution.
Borlaug won the Noble Peace Prize in 1970, and it seemed that the Green Revolution was an unequivocal success, a triumph of science, technology, and global economics.
The green revolution has had a dramatic impact on incomes and food supplies in many developing countries.
The article "Hidden Downsides of the Green Revolution" (June/July 2014) was excellent and right to the point--the best thing I've read in a long time concerning the Green Revolution.
He says this is the green revolution that the entire world must follow.
It is worth mentioning that Norman Borlaug's approach to increasing global food production resulted in the saving of about one billion people worldwide from famine, starvation and death and earned him the title "Father of the Green Revolution".