Gaia hypothesis

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Gaia hypothesis

(gī′ə)
n.
1. A hypothesis stating that Earth's biota constitute a single interconnected system that affects or determines the physical and chemical conditions within the biosphere, including such conditions as global temperatures, the composition of the atmosphere, and the salinity of seawater.
2. Any of various related hypotheses stating that this system is self-regulating, as through feedback loops, or that it constitutes a living organism, in either case acting to maintain stable conditions that are optimal for the continuation of life.
Gaia is the theoretical opposite of Darwinism; it postulates that living organisms control and modify the relative compositions of the sea, air, and environment
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important aspects of the Gaia hypothesis is the cybernetic feedback
The Gaia hypothesis -- first articulated by James Lovelock and Lynn Margulis in the 1970s -- holds that Earth's physical and biological processes are inextricably connected to form a self-regulating, essentially sentient, system.
He evokes the Gaia hypothesis to explain that these millions of organizations and the passionate individuals involved in them are acting as an immune system fighting off disease.
James Lovelock, the father of the Gaia hypothesis, said that the earth has a fever, and predicted that a warmer planet would be unlikely to support more than 500 million humans.
At age 87, James Lovelock remains the indefatigable proponent of the Gaia hypothesis, which depicts Earth as a living entity.
The Gaia hypothesis is a rather radical conception of co-evolution of biology and geology.
The Gaia hypothesis considers Earth, including water, air, and all forms of life, as a single, complex system.
Chapter ten continues the discussion of the Gaia hypothesis as appropriated by science fiction writers such as Lem.
It explains how to understand power laws, the Gaia hypothesis, and "self-organized criticality" without devolving into reification, teleological argument, appeals to the mystical, or other intellectual shortcuts.
Evolution of organizational cultures as selection by consequences: The Gaia hypothesis, metacontingencies, and organizational ecology.