estuary

(redirected from The Estuary)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

estuary

the point at which a river meets the sea. There is thus a mixture of saline and freshwater conditions, often with areas of tidal mudflats and salt marsh. Because of the varying salinity and tidal cover there is often a specific flora and fauna associated with such areas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Adriano Graldello, an honorary KWS warden, promised to support the trust to conserve the estuary and protect the animals.
Since securing the initial part of the reserve on the estuary, originally known as Gayton Sands, the RSPB land holdings have expanded significantly, particularly around the village of Burton, four miles from Parkgate.
As part of the national Tipping Points project, Candida Savage and her team are collecting and analysing samples to study how the estuary responds to the stressors of excess nutrients and sediment.
NH4 (ml-1)###10.23 a,b###61.6a###7.22b###0.064 c###2.1 b###1.47b,c###0.6b,c###1.5b,c###2.2b,c###7.91### 2 ug l-1), causing acute level of eutrophication along the estuary indicate the large influence of freshwater discharge in this region.
The heavier seawater similarly slides in from the ocean along the bottom of the estuary, beneath the freshwater layer.
The Hudson River Research Reserve includes four tidal wetland and upland complexes throughout the estuary, and acts as a field laboratory to improve coastal management research and education, and promote sustainability.
BRIONY O'CLARKE: There is a lookout in Portmeirion's wilderness where you can sit and look out across the Estuary for miles.
The estuary's starting point is at the north eastern part of Boubyan Island stretching to Warba Island to meet with Khor Al-Zubair in Iraq.
The estuary is represented by a fluvial valley that is almost completely infilled by sediments.
The tidal influence decreases and the environment becomes less limiting upward the estuary. With more species being physiologically able to inhabit the area, the importance of the competitive interactions increases.
Water management strategies such as diversion of freshwater out of a river before it reaches the estuary, as seen in the Apalachicola River, can disrupt natural cycles for oysters and other estuarine organisms.
Earlier this year investment company Cluff Natural Resources plc was awarded a licence by the Coal Authority to explore a project to create "syngas" from seams beneath the estuary.